Neurology of ME/CFS

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Progressive Brain Changes Six-year Longitudinal MRI Study of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients (2016) Source: J Magnetic Res Imaging.[1] License: CC-BY-NC-4.0 https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.25283

Brain imaging[edit | edit source]

Grey and white matter differences in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – A voxel-based morphometry study (2018) Source: Finkelmeyer et al. NeuroImage: Clinical 17 pp.24-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2017.09.024
Reduced Activation in Basal Ganglia Structures in CFS compared to Controls for the Win-Lose Contrast.[2]
Source: Miller et al. (2014). PLoS ONE 9(5): e98156. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0098156

Spine[edit | edit source]

Neural strain[edit | edit source]

In a study of neuromuscular strain in ME/CFS, 60 people with ME/CFS and 20 healthy controls randomly were assigned to undergo a neuromuscular strain maneuver or sham maneuver. Those with ME/CFS in the strain condition group had significantly increased symptoms for up to 24 hours.[3]

Causes of neurological symptoms[edit | edit source]

Sketch of a brain with words inside saying intracranial hypertension, impaired cerebral blood flow, hyperventilation/hypocapnia, and adrenergic hyperactivity.
Key neurological pathomechanisms in ME/CFS are intracranial hypertension, impaired cerebral blood flow, hyperventilation/hypocapnia, and adrenergic hyperactivity.

Source:
Wirth, K.J., Scheibenbogen, C. & Paul, F. An attempt to explain the neurological symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. J Transl Med 19, 471 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-021-03143-3

Causes of neurological symptoms in ME/CFS include:

These can explain cognitive impairment, brain fog, headache, psychomotor slowing, ataxia and loss of coordination of movements, hypersensitivity, sleep disturbances and dysautonomia.[4]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2021, An attempt to explain the neurological symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[4] - (Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Researchers[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Shan, ZY; Kwiatek, R; Burnet, R; Del Fante, P; Staines, DR; Marshall-Gradisnik, SM; Barnden, LR (April 28, 2016), "Progressive brain changes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A longitudinal MRI study", Journal of magnetic resonance imaging: JMRI, doi:10.1002/jmri.25283, PMID 27123773
  2. Finkelmeyer, Andreas; He, Jiabao; Maclachlan, Laura; Watson, Stuart; Gallagher, Peter; Newton, Julia L.; Blamire, Andrew M. (2018), "Grey and white matter differences in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – A voxel-based morphometry study", NeuroImage: Clinical, 17: 24-30, doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2017.09.024, PMID 29021956
  3. Violand, Richard L.; Thompson, Carol B.; Moni, Malini; Marden, Colleen L.; Jasion, Samantha E.; Lauver, Megan; Fontaine, Kevin R.; Rowe, Peter C. (July 18, 2016). "Neuromuscular Strain Increases Symptom Intensity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". PLOS ONE. 11 (7): e0159386. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0159386. ISSN 1932-6203.
  4. 4.04.14.2 Wirth, Klaus J.; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Paul, Friedemann (November 22, 2021). "An attempt to explain the neurological symptoms of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Translational Medicine. 19 (1): 471. doi:10.1186/s12967-021-03143-3. ISSN 1479-5876. PMC 8607226. PMID 34809664.
  5. "77. ME & the brain, part 1 / ME & de hersenen, deel 1 - Dr. Neil Harrison". YouTube. Wetenschap voor Patienten - ME/cvs Vereniging. April 5, 2016.
  6. "78. ME & the brain, part 2 / ME & de hersenen, deel 2 - Dr. Neil Harrison". YouTube. Wetenschap voor Patienten - ME/cvs Vereniging. April 19, 2016.
  7. Harrison, Neil (May 3, 2016). "79. ME & inflammation, part 1 / ME & inflammatie, deel 1 - Dr Harrison". YouTube. Wetenschap voor Patienten - ME/cvs Vereniging.
  8. "ME/CFS Involves Brain Inflammation: Results from a Ramsay Pilot Study". YouTube. SolveCFS. December 14, 2018.
  9. Johnson, Cort (July 25, 2016). "Laggard: Is an Under-Active Brain the Problem in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)". Health Rising. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  10. Chapman, Suzy (2017). "Reference List of Neurology studies - ME CFS 2017" (PDF). Dropbox. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  11. Johnson, Cort (September 24, 2018). "Brain on Fire: Widespread Neuroinflammation Found in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)". Health Rising. Retrieved November 29, 2018.
  12. "Brain Imaging and Behavior publication from Dr. Jarred Younger's SMCI Ramsay pilot study supports involvement of neuroinflammation in ME/CFS". go.solvecfs.org. Retrieved January 17, 2019.

muscle strain An injury involving a stretched or torn muscle or tendon (tendons are fibrous cords of tissue that connect muscle to bone).

cerebral blood flow (CBF) - the amount of blood that goes through the arterial tree in the brain in a given amount of time

dysautonomia disorders of the autonomic nervous system that cause disturbances in all or some autonomic functions, may cause problems regulating autonomic functions, including heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and digestion. Can cause symptoms including lightheadedness, fainting, unstable blood pressure, and orthostatic intolerance.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.