Richard Kwiatek

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Dr. Richard Kwiatek, MBBS, is a rheumatologist in North Adelaide, South Australia, Australia who works with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and fibromyalgia patients.

In 2004, Dr. Kwiatek was a member of ME/CFS GP Guidelines taskforce which wrote a physician guidebook: "ME/CFS Guidelines Myalgic Encephalopathy (ME)/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) Management Guidelines for General Practitioners."[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Clinic location[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://sacfs.asn.au/download/guidelines.pdf
  2. Leighton R Barnden, Benjamin Crouch, Richard Kwiatek, Richard Burnet, Anacleto Mernone, Steve Chryssidis, Garry Scroop, Peter Del Fante. (2011). A brain MRI study of chronic fatigue syndrome: evidence of brainstem dysfunction and altered homeostasis. Nmr in Biomedicine.
  3. Barnden, LR; Crouch, B; Kwiatek, R; Burnet, R; Del Fante, P (Feb 22, 2015), "Evidence in chronic fatigue syndrome for severity-dependent upregulation of prefrontal myelination that is independent of anxiety and depression", Nmr in Biomedicine, doi:10.1002/nbm.3261 
  4. Barnden, LR; Kwiatek, R; Crouch, B; Burnet, R; Del Fante, P (2016), "Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", NeuroImage: Clinical, 11: 530-537, doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.03.017 
  5. Shan, Zack Y.; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall‐Gradisnik, Sonya; Barnden, Leighton R. (2016), "Progressive brain changes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A longitudinal MRI study", Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 44: 1301–1311, doi:10.1002/jmri.25283 
  6. Ramos, S; Brenu, E; Broadley, S; Kwiatek, R; Ng, J; Nguyen, T; Freeman, S; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S (Mar 20, 2016), "Regulatory T, natural killer T and γδ T cells in multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a comparison" (PDF), Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol, 2016 (34): 300-305, doi:10.12932/AP0733 
  7. Nelson, Maximillian J.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Thomson, Rebecca L.; Clark, Daniel; Kwiatek, Richard; Davison, Kade (Dec 2019). "Diagnostic sensitivity of 2-day cardiopulmonary exercise testing in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Translational Medicine. 17 (1). doi:10.1186/s12967-019-1836-0. ISSN 1479-5876. PMID 30871578. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.