Magnetic resonance imaging

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) uses magnetic fields and radio waves to produce images of thin slices of tissues. MRI scans can be used to image many different parts of the body, including the brain, joints, major organs and even the whole body.[1]

MRI scans can be used for many different purposes, e.g. to show:

  • abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord
  • abnormalities in various parts of the body such as breast, prostate, and liver
  • joint injuries or abnormalities, for example a knee injury
  • heart structure and function
  • areas of activity within the brain, using a functional MRI
  • blood flow through blood vessels and arteries[2]

ME/CFS MRI evidence[edit | edit source]

  • Possible white matter abnormalities of unknown etiology are found on MRIs of some ME/CFS patients. These are identified by T2 hyperintensities, which might indicate lesions or Virchow-Robin spaces.[3][4]
brain scans showing brain changes
Progressive brain changes in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Shan et al. (2016).[5]

Cost and availability[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1993, A controlled study of brain magnetic resonance imaging in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome[3]
  • 1999, Brain MRI abnormalities exist in a subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[4]
  • 2016, Progressive Brain Changes in Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Longitudinal MRI Study[6]
  • 2016, Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[7]
  • 2017, Medial prefrontal cortex deficits correlate with unrefreshing sleep in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[8]
  • 2018, Decreased Connectivity and Increased Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Complexity in the Default Mode Network in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[9]
  • 2018, Brain function characteristics of chronic fatigue syndrome: A task fMRI study[10]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Magnetic Resonance Imaging - Special Subjects - MSD Manual Professional Edition". MSD Manual Professional Edition. Retrieved Oct 12, 2018. 
  2. Health Center for Devices and Radiological. "MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) - Uses". www.fda.gov. Retrieved Oct 12, 2018. 
  3. 3.03.1 Natelson, B. H.; Cohen, J. M.; Brassloff, I.; Lee, H. J. (Dec 15, 1993). "A controlled study of brain magnetic resonance imaging in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 120 (2): 213–217. doi:10.1016/0022-510x(93)90276-5. ISSN 0022-510X. PMID 8138812. 
  4. 4.04.1 Lange, G.; DeLuca, J.; Maldjian, J. A.; Lee, H.; Tiersky, L. A.; Natelson, B. H. (Dec 1, 1999). "Brain MRI abnormalities exist in a subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 171 (1): 3–7. doi:10.1016/s0022-510x(99)00243-9. ISSN 0022-510X. PMID 10567042. 
  5. Shan, Zack Y.; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M.; Barnden, Leighton R. (Apr 28, 2016). "Progressive brain changes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A longitudinal MRI study". Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 44 (5): 1301–1311. doi:10.1002/jmri.25283. ISSN 1053-1807. PMC 5111735Freely accessible. PMID 27123773. 
  6. Shan, Zack Y.; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Fante, Peter Del; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall‐Gradisnik, Sonya M.; Barnden, Leighton R. (2016). "Progressive brain changes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A longitudinal MRI study". Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 44 (5): 1301–1311. doi:10.1002/jmri.25283. ISSN 1522-2586. PMC 5111735Freely accessible. PMID 27123773. 
  7. Barnden, Leighton R.; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter (Jan 1, 2016). "Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". NeuroImage: Clinical. 11: 530–537. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2016.03.017. ISSN 2213-1582. 
  8. Shan, Zack Y.; Kwiatek, Richard; Burnet, Richard; Fante, Peter Del; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall‐Gradisnik, Sonya M.; Barnden, Leighton R. (2017). "Medial prefrontal cortex deficits correlate with unrefreshing sleep in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". NMR in Biomedicine. 30 (10): e3757. doi:10.1002/nbm.3757. ISSN 1099-1492. 
  9. Shan, Zack Y.; Finegan, Kevin; Bhuta, Sandeep; Ireland, Timothy; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M.; Barnden, Leighton R. (Feb 2018). "Decreased Connectivity and Increased Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Complexity in the Default Mode Network in Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Brain Connectivity. 8 (1): 33–39. doi:10.1089/brain.2017.0549. ISSN 2158-0022. PMID 29152994. 
  10. Shan, Zack Y.; Finegan, Kevin; Bhuta, Sandeep; Ireland, Timothy; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M.; Barnden, Leighton R. (Jan 1, 2018). "Brain function characteristics of chronic fatigue syndrome: A task fMRI study". NeuroImage: Clinical. 19: 279–286. doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2018.04.025. ISSN 2213-1582. 

T2 hyperintensity - An unusual bright spot on a T2-weighted MRI of the brain. Also known as an Unidentified Bright Object (UBO). T2 hyperintensities are often found in the periventricular region, where they may be referred to as "white matter hyperintensities" or "leukoaraiosis". They may also be found in the basal ganglia or brainstem, where they are sometimes referred to as "gray matter hyperintensities", or "subcortical hyperintensities". T2 hyperintensities can represent different things: lesions, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, or demyelination. They are commonly found in elderly individuals and in neurological disorders. (Learn more: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

Virchow-Robin space - A space inside the blood-brain barrier that surrounds blood vessels. They are also known as perivascular spaces. Immune cells from the blood often enter the Virchow-Robin space, but are unable to enter the brain. In cases of neuroinflammation, immune cells may accumulate in the Virchow-Robin space, unable to enter the brain. This accumulation of immune cells (called perivascular cuffing) may lead to an enlarged Virchow-Robin space. Enlarged Virchow-Robin spaces may be visible in an MRI image of the brain. (Learn more: en.wikipedia.org)

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.