David Systrom

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David M. Systrom, MD, practices Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and is the Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cardiopulmonary laboratory, both in Boston, Massachusetts, US. He teaches as an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.[1]

Education[edit | edit source]

Dr. Systrom earned his medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School. He completed a residency in internal medicine at Emory University Hospital, then a fellowship in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.[2]

Research[edit | edit source]

In 2019, Dr. Systrom began recruiting for a clinical trial of pyridostigmine.[3]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2016, Unexplained exertional dyspnea caused by low ventricular filling pressures: results from clinical invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing[4]
  • 2019, The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Results from an Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Laboratory[5] - (Abstract)

Clinic location[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

  • Institution

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "David M. Systrom, MD - Brigham and Women's Hospital". physiciandirectory.brighamandwomens.org. Retrieved Mar 1, 2019. 
  2. "Announcing SMCI's new ME/CFS research program at Brigham's and Women Hospital". Solve ME/CFS Initiative. Retrieved Apr 8, 2019. 
  3. "The Exercise Response to Pharmacologic Cholinergic Stimulation in Preload Failure - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov". clinicaltrials.gov. Retrieved Apr 8, 2019. 
  4. Oldham, William M.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Systrom, David M. (Mar 2016). "Unexplained Exertional Dyspnea Caused by Low Ventricular Filling Pressures: Results from Clinical Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing". Pulmonary Circulation. 6 (1): 55–62. doi:10.1086/685054. ISSN 2045-8932. PMC 4860548Freely accessible. PMID 27162614. 
  5. Joseph, P.; Sanders, J.; Oaklander, A.L.; Arevalo Rodriguez, T.C.A.; Oliveira, R.; Faria Urbina, M.; Waxman, A.B.; Systrom, D.M. (May 2019). "The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Results from an Invasive Cardiopulmonary Exercise Laboratory". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 2019. 2019 (199): A6902. doi:10.1164/ajrccm-conference.2019.199.1_MeetingAbstracts.A6902. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.