Dane Cook

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search
Source:DaneB.Cook/Twitter

Professor Dane B. Cook, PhD, is Co-Director of the Exercise Psychology laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Director of the Marsh Center for Research in Exercise and Movement. Dr Cook has investigated post-exertional malaise. His primary research interests are to determine the psychobiological mechanisms of pain and fatigue and to learn how exercise can be used to better understand and treat these phenomena in healthy adults and those suffering from chronic pain and fatigue.[1]

Awards[edit | edit source]

  • 1997, Louise E. Kindig Research Award. This competitive award is given every two years by the School of Health and Human Performance at the University of Georgia to recognize outstanding research by a graduate student.[2]
  • 2003, Junior Investigator Award to encourage young CFS/FM researchers in recognition of their work awarded by IACFSME.[3]
  • 2004, New Investigator Award from the American College of Sports Medicine given to the exercise science or sports medicine researcher who has made, and who is likely to continue to make, significant contributions to knowledge in basic or clinical exercise science or sports medicine.[4]
  • 2011, Department of Veterans Affairs Service Award in recognition of 10 years of dedicated service to the United States Government[5]

CFSAC Committee[edit | edit source]

Cook was a voting member of the Health and Human Services's Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee for the term 05/10/10 to 5/10/14 which was then extended for the current term of 05/10/14 to 05/10/17.[6][7]

ME/CFS Common Data Elements (CDE) Project[edit | edit source]

Dr Cook serves on the Post-Exertional Malaise Working Group of the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Common Data Element (CDE) Project sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[8]

Research[edit | edit source]

  • 2003, Perceived exertion in fatiguing illness: civilians with chronic fatigue syndrome[9](Abstract)
  • 2005, Exercise and cognitive performance in chronic fatigue syndrome[10](Abstract)
  • 2005, Objective evidence of cognitive complaints in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: a BOLD fMRI study of verbal working memory[11](Abstract)
  • 2006, The influence of aerobic fitness and fibromyalgia on cardiorespiratory and perceptual responses to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[12](Full Text)
  • 2007, A real-time assessment of the effect of exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome[13](Full Text)
  • 2007, Functional neuroimaging correlates of mental fatigue induced by cognition among chronic fatigue syndrome patients and controls[14](Abstract)
  • 2010, Sleep is not disrupted by exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[15](Full Text)
  • 2012, Responses to Exercise Differ for chronic fatigue syndrome patients with fibromyalgia[16](Full Text)
  • 2012, Minimum data elements for research reports on CFS[17](Full Text)
  • 2013, Exercise and sleep deprivation do not change cytokine expression levels in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[18](Full Text)
  • 2013, The Effects of Exercise on Dynamic Sleep Morphology in Healthy Controls and Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[19](Full Text)
  • 2013, Post-Exertion Malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Symptoms and Gene Expression[20](Abstract)
  • 2015, Changes in Gut and Plasma Microbiome following Exercise Challenge in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)[21](Full Text)
  • 2017, Symptom variability following acute exercise in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a perspective on measuring post-exertion malaise[22](Abstract)
  • 2017, Neural Consequences of Post-Exertion Malaise in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[23](Full Text)

Talks[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/kinesiology/people/graduate-faculty/dane-cook
  2. http://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/Kinesiology/people/graduate-faculty/dane-cook
  3. http://iacfsme.org/Organization/Former-IACFS-ME-Awardees.aspx
  4. http://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/Kinesiology/people/graduate-faculty/dane-cook
  5. http://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/Kinesiology/people/graduate-faculty/dane-cook
  6. http://nih.granicus.com/DocumentViewer.php?file=nih_e174f9bd-ae0f-4a45-9955-827cb608db2f.pdf
  7. http://www.hhs.gov/advcomcfs/roster/index.html
  8. "Complete Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CDE Roster". NIH. Retrieved Oct 11, 2019. 
  9. Cook, DB; Nagelkirk, PR; Peckerman, A; Poluri, A; Lamanca, JJ; Natelson, BH (2003), "Perceived exertion in fatiguing illness: civilians with chronic fatigue syndrome", Med Sci Sports Exerc., 35 (4): 563-8., doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000058360.61448.6C, PMID 12673137 
  10. Cook, DB; Nagelkirk, PR; Peckerman, A; Poluri, A; Mores, J; Natelson, BH (2005), "Exercise and cognitive performance in chronic fatigue syndrome", Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 37 (9): 1460-7, PMID 16177595 
  11. Lange, G; Steffener, J; Cook, DB; Bly, BM; Christodoulou, C; Liu, WC; Deluca, J; Natelson, BH (2005), "Objective evidence of cognitive complaints in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: a BOLD fMRI study of verbal working memory", NeuroImage, 26 (2): 513-24, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2005.02.011, PMID 15907308 
  12. Cook, Dane B.; Nagelkirk, Paul R.; Poluri, Ashok; Mores, John; Natelson, Benjamin H. (Oct 2006). "The influence of aerobic fitness and fibromyalgia on cardiorespiratory and perceptual responses to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Arthritis & Rheumatism. 54 (10): 3351–3362. doi:10.1002/art.22124. ISSN 0004-3591. 
  13. Yoshiuchi, K; Cook, DB; Ohashi, K; Kumano, H; Kuboki, T; Yamamoto, Y; Natelson, BH, "A real-time assessment of the effect of exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome", Physiology & Behavior, 92 (5): 963-8, doi:10.1016/j.physbeh.2007.07.001, PMID 17655887 
  14. Cook, DB; O'Connor, PJ; Lange, G; Steffener, J (2007), "Functional neuroimaging correlates of mental fatigue induced by cognition among chronic fatigue syndrome patients and controls", NeuroImage, 36 (1): 108-22, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.02.033, PMID 17408973 
  15. Togo, F; Natelson, BH; Cherniack, NS; Rapoport, DM; Klapholz, M; Cook, DB (2010), "Sleep is not disrupted by exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome", Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42 (1): 16-22, doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181b11bc7, PMID 20010134 
  16. Cook, Dane B.; Stegner, Aaron J.; Nagelkirk, P.R.; Meyer, Jacob D.; Togo, F.; Natelson, B.H. (2012), "Responses to Exercise Differ for chronic fatigue syndrome patients with fibromyalgia", Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 44 (6): 1186-1193, doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182417b9a, PMID 22157881 
  17. Jason, LA; Unger, ER; Dimitrakoff, JD; Fagin, AP; Houghton, M; Cook, DB; Marshall, GD, Jr; Klimas, N; Snell, C (2012), "Minimum data elements for research reports on CFS", Brain, Behavior, Immunology, 26 (3): 401-6, doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2012.01.014, PMID 22306456 
  18. Nakamura, T; Schwander, S; Donnelly, R; Cook, DB; Ortega, F; Togo, F; Yamamoto, Y; Cherniack, NS; Klapholz, M; Rapoport, D; Natelson, BH (2013), "Exercise and sleep deprivation do not change cytokine expression levels in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome", Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 20 (11): 1736-1742, doi:10.1128/CVI.00527-13 
  19. Kishi, A; Togo, F; Cook, DB; Klapholz, M; Yamamoto, Y; Rapoport, DM; Natelson, BH (2013), "The Effects of Exercise on Dynamic Sleep Morphology in Healthy Controls and Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Physiological Reports, 1 (6): 1-14 
  20. Meyer, Jacob D; Light, Alan R; Shukla, Sanjay K; Clevidence, Derek; Yale, Steven; Stegner, Aaron J; Cook, Dane C (2013), "Post-Exertion Malaise in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Symptoms and Gene Expression", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health, & Behavior, 1 (4): 190-209, doi:10.1080/21641846.2013.838444 
  21. Shukla, SK; Cook, DB; Meyer, J; Vernon, SD; Le, T; Clevidence, D; Robertson, CE; Schrodi, SJ; Yale, S; Frank, DN (2015), "Changes in Gut and Plasma Microbiome following Exercise Challenge in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)", PLoS One, 18, 10 (12): e0145453, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0145453 
  22. Lindheimer, Jacob B.; Meyer, Jacob D.; Stegner, Aaron J.; Dougherty, Ryan J.; Van Riper, Stephanie M.; Shields, Morgan; Reisner, Amanda; Shukla, Sanjay K.; Light, Alan R.; Yale, Steven; Cook, Dane B. (2017), "Symptom variability following acute exercise in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: a perspective on measuring post-exertion malaise", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 5 (2): 69-88, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1321166 
  23. Cook, Dane B.; Light, Alan R.; Light, Kathleen C.; Broderick, Gordon; Shields, Morgan R.; Dougherty, Ryan J.; Meyer, Jacob D.; VanRiper, Stephanie; Stegner, Aaron J.; Ellingson, Laura D.; Vernon, Suzanne D. (2017), "Neural Consequences of Post-Exertion Malaise in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2017.02.009 

Chronic fatigue syndrome advisory committee (CFSAC) - (sometimes pronounced SIF-SACK) A US government advisory council that met twice per year, covering current topics related to Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Meetings usually lasted for two days and the results were presented to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS). After 15 years, on September 5, 2018, CFSAC's charter was not renewed by the Department of HHS, effectively dissolving the committee without notice or warning.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Cognition - Thought processes, including attention, reasoning, and memory.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.