Neurotransmitter

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
(Redirected from Neurotransmitters)
Jump to: navigation, search

Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemical messengers that transmit signals between neurons, or from neurons to other cells.[1] Neurotransmitters may transmit signals across neuromuscular junctions, between muscle cells, gland cells, and immune cells.

Over 100 substances that act as neurotransmitters to have been identified. The most common are:

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wilkinson, Michael; Brown, Richard E., eds. (2015). "Neurotransmitters". An Introduction to Neuroendocrinology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 79–114. ISBN 978-0-521-80647-3.

endogenous Growing or originating from within an organism.

glutamate (Glu) - Glutamate is one of the amino acids used by the body to make proteins. It is a salt or ester of glutamic acid, and the terms glutamate and glutamic acid are often used interchangeably. It also functions as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.

indoleamine (IDO) - any derivatives of an indole (e.g., serotonin, tryptophan) that contain an amine group

anticholinergic (ACh) - Involving blocking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Anticholinergic side effects may include dilated pupils in the eyes, photophobia, dry mouth, decreased mucus in the lungs, respiratory depression, decreased gastrointestinal motility, constipation, decreased then increased blood pressure, rapid heartbeat or heart palpitations, urinary retention, vasodilation, drowsiness, confusion, and agitation, and decreased sweating.

endogenous Growing or originating from within an organism.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.