Neurotransmitter

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Neurotransmitters are endogenous chemical messengers that transmit signals between neurons, or from neurons to other cells.[1] Neurotransmitters may transmit signals across neuromuscular junctions, between muscle cells, gland cells, and immune cells.

Over 100 substances that act as neurotransmitters to have been identified. The most common are:

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wilkinson, Michael; Brown, Richard E., eds. (2015). "Neurotransmitters". An Introduction to Neuroendocrinology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 79–114. ISBN 978-0-521-80647-3. 

endogenous - Growing or originating from within an organism.

glutamate (Glu) - Glutamate is one of the amino acids used by the body to make proteins. It is a salt or ester of glutamic acid, and the terms glutamate and glutamic acid are often used interchangeably. It also functions as the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain.

endogenous - Growing or originating from within an organism.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.