Paul McCrone

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Professor Paul McCrone (Paul Richard McCrone) is Professor of Health Economics, and Director of Health Economics at the Institute of Psychiatry, a department of King's College London.[1][2] Professor McCrone is also a co-Director of the Mental Health Policy Research Unit, which is jointly led by King's College London and University College London and funded by the National Institute for Health Research, UK.[3] He has worked at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience for 25 years.[4]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2003, Cost-effectiveness of counselling, graded-exercise and usual care for chronic fatigue: evidence from a randomised trial in primary care[5](Abstract)
  • 2003, The economic cost of chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome in UK primary care[6](Abstract)

PACE trial publications include:

Main trial outcome
Other PACE trial publications

Letters[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Professor Paul McCrone has given a number of presentations at the Science Media Centre, including several promoting the benefits of Cognitive behavioral therapy or graded exercise therapy for ME/CFS, and lectures or seminars on the same topic at other UK universities.[14] He has been quoted in a number of news articles or press releases promoting the effectiveness or cost effectiveness of these treatments.[15][16][17]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Paul McCrone - Research Portal, King's College, London". kclpure.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  2. "King's College London - Paul McCrone". www.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  3. "King's College London - Research unit to bring evidence to forefront of mental health policy". www.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  4. "King's College London - Research unit to bring evidence to forefront of mental health policy". www.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  5. Sabes-Figuera, Ramon; McCrone, Paul; Hurley, Mike; King, Michael; Donaldson, Ana Nora; Ridsdale, Leone (Aug 20, 2012). "Cost-effectiveness of counselling, graded-exercise and usual care for chronic fatigue: evidence from a randomised trial in primary care". BMC Health Services Research. 12 (1): 264. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-12-264. ISSN 1472-6963. PMC 3480915Freely accessible. PMID 22906319. 
  6. Seed, P.; Ridsdale, L.; Darbishire, L.; McCrone, P. (Feb 2003). "The economic cost of chronic fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome in UK primary care". Psychological Medicine. 33 (2): 253–261. doi:10.1017/S0033291702006980. ISSN 1469-8978. 
  7. Seed, P.; Darbishire, L.; Ridsdale, L.; McCrone, P. (Aug 2004). "Cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy, graded exercise and usual care for patients with chronic fatigue in primary care". Psychological Medicine. 34 (6): 991–999. doi:10.1017/S0033291704001928. ISSN 1469-8978. 
  8. Clark, Lucy V.; McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D. (Jun 8, 2016), "Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study", JMIR research protocols, 5 (2): 70, doi:10.2196/resprot.5395, PMC 4917732Freely accessible, PMID 27278762 
  9. White, PD; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; Bavinton, J; Angus, BJ; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; The PACE Trial Management Group (Mar 5, 2011), "Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial", The Lancet, 377 (9768): 823–836, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60096-2, PMID 21334061 
  10. McCrone, P; Sharpe, M; Chalder, T; Knapp, M; Johnson, AL; Goldsmith, K (Aug 1, 2012), "Adaptive Pacing, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Graded Exercise, and Specialist Medical Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis", PLoS One, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0040808, PMID 22870204 
  11. Walwyn, R; Potts, L; McCrone, P; Johnson, AL; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Goldsmith, KA; Sharpe, M; Chalder, T; White, PD (Nov 13, 2013), "A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan", Trials Journal, doi:10.1186/1745-6215-14-386 
  12. White, PD; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; Angus, BJ; Baber, HL; Bavinton, J; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; DeCesare, JC; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; McCrone, P; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; Wilks, D (Jan 2017). "Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty". Journal of Health Psychology. 22 (9): 1113–1117. doi:10.1177/1359105316688953. 
  13. "Testing a 'controversial' treatment for CFS/ME in children | Science Media Centre". Science Media Centre. Science Media Centre. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  14. "Paul McCrone - Centre for Health Economics, The University of York". www.york.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  15. "Brain training best value for ME". BBC news. Aug 2, 2012. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  16. Queen Mary University of London. "SMD - Two effective chronic fatigue syndrome treatments are good value for money - Queen Mary University of London". www.qmul.ac.uk. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 
  17. "Calls to scrap common treatment for ME". BBC News. May 8, 2018. Retrieved Feb 5, 2019. 

Chronic fatigue (CF) - Persistent and abnormal fatigue is a symptom, not an illness. It may be caused by depression, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome or many other illnesses. The term "chronic fatigue" should never be confused with the disease chronic fatigue syndrome.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) - A type of psychotherapy geared toward modifying alleged unhealthy thinking, behaviors or illness beliefs. One of the treatment arms used in the controversial PACE trial.

Graded exercise therapy (GET) - A gradual increase in exercise or activity, according to a pre-defined plan. Focuses on overcoming the patient's alleged unhelpful illness beliefs that exertion can exacerbate symptoms, rather than on reversing physical deconditioning. Considered controversial, and possibly harmful, in the treatment or management of ME. One of the treatment arms of the controversial PACE trial.

Randomized controlled trial (RCT) - A trial in which participants are randomly assigned to two groups, with one group receiving the treatment being studied and a control or comparison group receiving a sham treatment, placebo, or comparison treatment.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.