Kimberley Goldsmith

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Kimberley A. Goldsmith is a researcher and senior lecturer at the Mental Health and Neuroscience Clinical Trials Unit, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College, London.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

PACE trial publications include:

Main trial outcome
Other PACE trial publications

Letters[edit | edit source]

PACE trial authors' responses
  • 2019, The PACE trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome: a response to WILSHIRE et al[14](Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

  • King's College, London

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Kimberley Goldsmith - Research Portal, King's College, London". kclpure.kcl.ac.uk. Retrieved Oct 16, 2018. 
  2. White, PD; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; Bavinton, J; Angus, BJ; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; The PACE Trial Management Group (Mar 5, 2011). "Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial". The Lancet. 377 (9768): 823–836. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60096-2. PMID 21334061. 
  3. McCrone, P; Sharpe, M; Chalder, T; Knapp, M; Johnson, AL; Goldsmith, K (Aug 1, 2012). "Adaptive Pacing, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Graded Exercise, and Specialist Medical Care for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis". PLoS One. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0040808. PMID 22870204. 
  4. White, PD; Goldsmith, K; Johnson, AL; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; PACE Trial Management Group (Oct 2013). "Recovery from chronic fatigue syndrome after treatments given in the PACE trial". Psychol Med. 43 (10): 2227-2235. doi:10.1017/S0033291713000020. PMID 3776285. 
  5. Walwyn, R; Potts, L; McCrone, P; Johnson, AL; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Goldsmith, KA; Sharpe, M; Chalder, T; White, PD (Nov 13, 2013). "A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan". Trials Journal. doi:10.1186/1745-6215-14-386. 
  6. Dougall, D; Johnson, A; Goldsmith, K; Sharpe, M; Angus, B; Chalder, T; White, P (Jul 2014). "Adverse events and deterioration reported by participants in the PACE trial of therapies for chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 77 (1): 20-26. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2014.04.002. 
  7. Chalder, T; Goldsmith, KA; White, PD; Sharpe, M; Pickles, AR (Jan 28, 2015). "Rehabilitative therapies for chronic fatigue syndrome: a secondary mediation analysis of the PACE trial". The Lancet Psychiatry. 2 (2): 141-52. doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(14)00069-8. PMID 26359750. 
  8. Sharpe, M; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Chalder, T; Walker, J; White, PD (Oct 27, 2015). "Rehabilitative treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome: long-term follow-up from the PACE trial". The Lancet Psychiatry. 2: 1067-74. doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00317-X. PMID 26521770. There was little evidence of differences in outcomes between the randomised treatment groups at long-term follow-up. 
  9. Goldsmith, KA; Chalder, T; White, PD; Sharpe, M; Pickles, AR (Nov 17, 2015). "Longitudinal mediation in the PACE randomised clinical trial of rehabilitative treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome: modelling and design considerations". Trials Journal / Paperity. 
  10. White, PD; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Walwyn, R; Baber, HL; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M (May 17, 2011). "(correspondence) The PACE trial in chronic fatigue syndrome – Authors' reply". The Lancet. 377 (9780): 1834–1835. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60651-X. 
  11. Chalder, T; Goldsmith, KA; White, PD; Sharpe, M; Pickles, AR (April 2015). "(response) Author's reply - Methods and outcome reporting in the PACE trial". The Lancet Psychiatry. 2 (4): e10–e11. doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(15)00114-5. 
  12. Sharpe, M; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Chalder, T; Walker, J; White, PD (February 2016). "(correspondence) Authors' reply - Patient reaction to the PACE trial". The Lancet Psychiatry. 3 (2): e8–e9. doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(16)00018-3. 
  13. White, PD; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; Angus, BJ; Baber, HL; Bavinton, J; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; DeCesare, JC; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; McCrone, P; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; Wilks, D (Jan 2017). "Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty". Journal of Health Psychology. 22 (9): 1113–1117. doi:10.1177/1359105316688953. 
  14. Sharpe, Michael; Goldsmith, Kim; Chalder, Trudie (Mar 12, 2019). "The PACE trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome: a response to WILSHIRE et al". BMC Psychology. 7 (1): 15. doi:10.1186/s40359-019-0288-x. ISSN 2050-7283. 

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.