David Wilks

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Dr David Wilks is a British researcher and infectious diseases specialist, who will soon be retiring from the Regional Infectious Diseases Unit at Western General Hospital, run by NHS Lothian in Scotland, UK.[1] Dr Wilks is an honorary associate of Edinburgh Medical School.[2]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

PACE trial: Main trial outcome

  • 1999, Comparison of Euroqol EQ-5D and SF-36 in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome [4](Abstract)
  • 2001, Health-related quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: an international study[5](Abstract)
  • 2002, The role of fear of physical movement and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome.[7](Full text)

Letters[edit | edit source]

PACE trial authors' responses

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. NHS Scotland (2018). "Western General Hospital | Jobs" (PDF). Retrieved Feb 17, 2019. 
  2. "Associate Members & Honorary Staff". The University of Edinburgh. Retrieved Feb 17, 2019. 
  3. White, PD; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; Bavinton, J; Angus, BJ; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; The PACE Trial Management Group (Mar 5, 2011), "Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial", The Lancet, 377 (9768): 823–836, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60096-2, PMID 21334061 
  4. Myers, C.; Wilks, D. (Jan 1, 1999). "Comparison of Euroqol EQ-5D and SF-36 in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Quality of Life Research. 8 (1): 9–16. doi:10.1023/A:1026459027453. ISSN 1573-2649. 
  5. Hardt, Jochen; Buchwald, Dedra; Wilks, D; Sharpe, M; Nix, W.A; Egle, U.T (Aug 2001). "Health-related quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 51 (2): 431–434. doi:10.1016/S0022-3999(01)00220-3. 
  6. Wilks, David; Sharpe, Michael (Aug 31, 2002). "Fatigue". BMJ. 325 (7362): 480–483. doi:10.1136/bmj.325.7362.480. ISSN 0959-8138. PMID 12202331. 
  7. Silver, A; Haeney, M; Vijayadurai, P; Wilks, D; Pattrick, M; Main, C.J (Jun 2002). "The role of fear of physical movement and activity in chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 52 (6): 485–493. doi:10.1016/S0022-3999(01)00298-7. 
  8. White, PD; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; Angus, BJ; Baber, HL; Bavinton, J; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; DeCesare, JC; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; McCrone, P; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; Wilks, D (Jan 2017). "Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty". Journal of Health Psychology. 22 (9): 1113–1117. doi:10.1177/1359105316688953. 

Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) - A 36-item patient-reported questionnaire, used to determine patient health status and quality of life.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

PACE trial - A controversial study which claimed that CBT and GET were effective in treating "CFS/ME", despite the fact that its own data did not support this conclusion. Its results and methodology were widely disputed by patients, scientists, and the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

somatic symptom disorder - A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience. Although "Somatic Symptom Disorder" is the term used by DSM-5, the term "Bodily Distress Disorder" has been proposed for ICD-11. (Learn more: www.psychologytoday.com)

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
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