Gabapentin

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
(Redirected from Horizant)
Jump to: navigation, search

Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant drug primarily developed to treat epilepsy, but now more commonly used for chronic pain.[1] It is being used off-label for ME/CFS and fibromyalgia patients mostly to augment pain relief.[2][3] Common brand names for gabapentin are Neurontin, Horizant, which is used for restless legs syndrome, and Gralise.[1] Gabapentin is very similar to Lyrica (pregabalin).[4]

Theory[edit | edit source]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

Gabapentin is one of the drugs suggested for use in people with ME/CFS to treat related pain; it is suggested in both the Canadian Consensus Criteria for ME/CFS and the International Consensus Criteria for ME.[5][6]

Side Effects[edit | edit source]

Many side effects have been reported.[7][1]

More commonly ones reported are:

  • clumsiness
  • unsteadiness, and continuous, uncontrolled, back-and-forth, or rolling eye movements
  • weight gain[5]

More commonly one reported in children are:

  • aggressive behavior or other behavior problems
  • anxiety
  • concentration problems and change in school performance
  • crying
  • depression
  • false sense of well-being
  • hyperactivity or increase in body movements
  • rapidly changing moods
  • reacting too quickly, too emotional, or overreacting
  • restlessness
  • suspiciousness or distrust

Less commonly ones reported are:

  • black, tarry stools
  • chest pain
  • chills
  • cough
  • depression, irritability, or other mood or mental changes
  • fever
  • loss of memory
  • pain or swelling in the arms or legs
  • painful or difficult urination
  • shortness of breath
  • sore throat
  • sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • swollen glands
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

adverse reaction Any unintended or unwanted response to a treatment, whether in a clinical trial or licensed treatment. May be minor or serious.

adverse reaction Any unintended or unwanted response to a treatment, whether in a clinical trial or licensed treatment. May be minor or serious.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - A set of biomedical research institutes operated by the U.S. government, under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.