Marjorie van de Sande

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Marjorie I. van de Sande, BEd, GradDipEd, is an educator, author and advocate who lives with myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and fibromyalgia (FM). She was the Director for Alberta and the Director of Education for the Canadian National ME/FM Action Network from 1995 – 2004 and then an advisor and editor/webmaster until 2010.[1]


Co-author case definitions and guidelines[edit | edit source]

Ms. van de Sande co-authored several case definitions and guidelines with Dr. Bruce Carruthers and the Canadian and International Expert Consensus Panels:

Articles[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Bruce Carruthers

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://phoenixrising.me/archives/5996
  2. http://www.mefmaction.com/images/stories/Support/TEACH-ME2edition.pdf
  3. Anil Kumar Jaina, Bruce M. Carruthers, Marjorie I. van de Sande, Stephen R. Barrond, C. C. Stuart Donaldsone, James V. Dunnef, Emerson Gingrichg, Dan S. Heffezh, Frances Y.-K. Leungi, Daniel G. Malonej, Thomas J. Romanok, I. Jon Russelllm, David Sauln & Donald G. Seibelo. (2003). Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Canadian Clinical Working Case Definition, Diagnostic and Treatment Protocols–A Consensus Document. Journal of Musculoskeletal Pain, 11(4):3-107. doi:10.1300/J094v11n04_02. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1300/J094v11n04_02
  4. Carruthers, Bruce M.; Jain, Anil Kumar; De Meirleir, Kenny L.; Peterson, Daniel L.; Klimas, Nancy G.; Lerner, A. Martin; Bested, Alison C.; Flor-Henry, Pierre; Joshi, Pradip; Powles, A C Peter; Sherkey, Jeffrey A.; van de Sande, Marjorie I. (2003), "Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Clinical Working Case Definition, Diagnostic and Treatment Protocols", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 11 (2): 7-115, doi:10.1300/J092v11n01_02 
  5. http://www.name-us.org/defintionspages/DefinitionsArticles/ConsensusDocument%20Overview.pdf
  6. http://www.mefmation.com/images/stories/Overviews/FMSOverview08.pdf
  7. Carruthers, Bruce M.; van de Sande, Marjorie I.; De Meirleir, Kenny L.; Klimas, Nancy G.; Broderick, Gordon; Mitchell, Terry; Staines, Donald; Powles, A. C. Peter; Speight, Nigel; Vallings, Rosamund; Bateman, Lucinda; Baumgarten-Austrheim, Barbara; Bell, David; Carlo-Stella, Nicoletta; Chia, John; Darragh, Austin; Jo, Daehyun; Lewis, Donald; Light, Alan; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Mena, Ismael; Mikovits, Judy; Miwa, Kunihisa; Murovska, Modra; Pall, Martin; Stevens, Staci (Aug 22, 2011). "Myalgic encephalomyelitis: International Consensus Criteria". Journal of Internal Medicine. 270 (4): 327–338. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02428.x. ISSN 0954-6820. PMC 3427890Freely accessible. PMID 21777306. 
  8. http://irishmecfs.org/Myalgic%20Encephalomyelitis%20International%20Consensus%20Primer-2012-11-24.pdf

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.