Characterisation, determinants, mechanisms and consequences of the long-term effects of COVID-19

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Characterisation, determinants, mechanisms and consequences of the long-term effects of COVID-19: providing the evidence base for health care services is a Long COVID research study first announced in February 2021.[1][2]

Aims[edit | edit source]

This project aims toprovide an evidence base for healthcare services to define what ‘Long-COVID’ is and improve diagnosis".[1][2]

Overview[edit | edit source]

It will address:

  • why some people get Long COVID
  • the typical effects of Long COVID on patient's health
  • effects of Long COVID on patient's ability to work
  • factors affecting recovery
  • how best to make sure patients are able to access the right treatment and support through the National Health Service[1]

Data from more than 60,000 people will be used, including anonymised health records.

  • A smaller groups of patients with Long COVID and similarly matched comparison groups will wear wristbands measuring exercise capacity, breathing, and heart rate, and complete online questionnaires on mental health and cognitive function. These groups will also have non-invasive imaging to assess for possible organ damage, including imaging the brain, lungs and heart.[1][2]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Funding[edit | edit source]

£9.6 million over three years.[1]

Results[edit | edit source]

None published yet.

Criticism[edit | edit source]

Investigators[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.21.31.4 "UCL researchers lead £11m projects to investigate Long Covid". University College London. February 17, 2021. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  2. 2.02.12.22.3 "£9.6 million for UCL 'long Covid' research". UCLH Biomedical Research Centre. 2021. Retrieved March 1, 2021.
  3. UCL (January 29, 2019). "Nishi Chaturvedi". UCL Research Domains. Retrieved March 1, 2021.

heart rate (HR) - the number of times the heart beats within a certain time period, usually a minute.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.