History of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome

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Greeks[edit | edit source]

Middle Ages[edit | edit source]

Victorian period[edit | edit source]

Neurasthenia[edit | edit source]

In 1869, George Miller Beard coined the term "neurasthenia." He thought it was an especially American affliction of nervous exhaustion, affected men who were "brain workers" and women who advanced too far in their education.

Hysteria[edit | edit source]

Jean-Martin Charcot. Many of his patients were suffering from epilepsy. Influence on Sigmund Freud and the concept of functional disorders.


20th century[edit | edit source]

Atypical polio[edit | edit source]

In 1934, an outbreak at Los Angeles County Hospital of a disease "resembling poliomyelitis" was recorded...

Icelandic Disease[edit | edit source]

Myalgic encephalomyelitis[edit | edit source]

In 1955, an outbreak at the Royal Free Hospital. Melvin Ramsay coined the term myalgic encephalomyelitis.

World Health Organization classification[edit | edit source]

Chronic fatigue syndrome[edit | edit source]

1984 Incline Village chronic fatigue syndrome outbreak

Chronic Epstein-Barr Virus[edit | edit source]

21st century[edit | edit source]

Systemic exertion intolerance disease[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history