John Richardson

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John Richardson, MB, BS, (1915-2002) was a British family practice physician who spent many years caring for and researching ME patients. He was a founding Member of the Newcastle Research Group, a member of the Melvin Ramsay Society, and the Environmental Medicine Association. He served as the Chairman of the 1989 Cambridge Symposium on the Clinical and Scientific Basis of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.[1] and the book that followed, The Clinical and Scientific Basis of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, edited by Byron Hyde, was dedicated to Dr. Richardson.[2]

Dr Richardson organized the first World Symposium on M.E. at Cambridge University in 1991 in collaboration with Dr. Byron Hyde and the Newcastle Research Group in the UK.[3]

In 2001, Dr Richardson wrote a book describing the relationship between exposure to enteroviruses or toxins such as organophosphates and onset of myalgic encephalomyelitis and other organ pathologies.[1]

Richardson's research was involved in demonstrating an association between ME, enterovirus infection, and hypothalamic dysfunction,[4]brainstem hypoperfusion,[5] and brain pathology at autopsy.[6]

Just prior to his death in 2002, he produced a physician's guide[7] on diagnosing and treating ME patients.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1995, Disturbance of Hypothalamic Function and Evidence for Persistent Enteroviral Infection in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[4] - (Abstract)
  • 1998, Relationship Between SPECT Scans and Buspirone Tests in Patients with ME/CFS[5] - (Abstract)
  • 2000, Four Cases of Pesticide Poisoning, Presenting as “ME,” Treated with a Choline and Ascorbic Acid Mixture[8] - (Abstract)
  • 2001, Viral Isolation from Brain in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis - Case Report[6] - (Abstract)
  • 2002, Toxins and Immunity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[9] - (Abstract)
  • 2002, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Guidelines for Doctors[7] - (Full text)

Book[edit | edit source]

Obituary[edit | edit source]

  • 2002, John Richardson - Obituary in the BMJ[10] - (Full text)
  • 2003, In Memoriam - John Richardson, Physician, 6th February 1915–18th July 2002[11]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 Montero, Roberto Patarca; Richardson, John (Jun 26, 2001). Enteroviral and Toxin Mediated Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Other Organ Pa. CRC Press. ISBN 9780789011282. 
  2. Dewar, H A (Sep 28, 2002). "John Richardson". BMJ : British Medical Journal. 325 (7366): 716. ISSN 0959-8138. PMC 1124231Freely accessible. 
  3. "Our Founder | Nightingale Research Foundation". nightingale.ca. Retrieved Mar 23, 2019. 
  4. 4.04.1 Richardson, John (Jan 1995). "Disturbance of Hypothalamic Function and Evidence for Persistent Enteroviral Infection in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 1 (2): 59–66. doi:10.1300/J092v01n02_05. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  5. 5.05.1 Richardson, John; Costaa, Durval Campos (Jan 1998). "Relationship Between SPECT Scans and Buspirone Tests in Patients with ME/CFS". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 4 (3): 23–38. doi:10.1300/J092v04n03_04. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  6. 6.06.1 Richardson, J. (Jan 2001). "Viral Isolation from Brain in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 9 (3-4): 15–19. doi:10.1300/J092v09n03_03. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  7. 7.07.1 Richardson, John (2002). "Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Guidelines for Doctors" (PDF). Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 10 (1): 65–80. doi:10.1300/J092v10n01_06. 
  8. Richardson, John (Jan 2000). "Four Cases of Pesticide Poisoning, Presenting as "ME," Treated with a Choline and Ascorbic Acid Mixture". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 6 (2): 11–21. doi:10.1300/J092v06n02_03. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  9. Richardson, John (Jan 2002). "Toxins and Immunity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 10 (3-4): 43–50. doi:10.1300/J092v10n03_05. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  10. Dewar, H A (Sep 28, 2002). "John Richardson". BMJ : British Medical Journal. 325 (7366): 716. ISSN 0959-8138. PMC 1124231Freely accessible. 
  11. Hyde, Byron M. (Jan 2003). "In Memoriam: John Richardson, Physician, 6th February 1915–18th July 2002". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 11 (2): 129–132. doi:10.1300/J092v11n02_10. ISSN 1057-3321. 

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

enterovirus - A genus of RNA viruses which typically enter the body through the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems and sometimes spread to the central nervous system or other parts of the body, causing neurological, cardiac, and other damage. Since the first reports of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), enteroviruses have been suspected as a cause of ME. Enteroviruses have also been implicated as the cause of Type I diabetes, congestive heart failure, and other conditions. Enteroviruses include poliovirus, coxsackieviruses, and many others. New enteroviruses and new strains of existing enteroviruses are continuously being discovered. (Learn more: viralzone.expasy.org)

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.