Donna Felsenstein

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Donna Felsenstein, M.D., is an Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease physician who practices at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, US[1] and is a Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).[2] She serves as a member of the scientific team with the Open Medicine Foundation.[2] Since 1979, she has been diagnosing and caring for patients with ME/CFS.[2] Her listed specialities include Lyme disease, Infectious diseases, and Herpes simplex virus.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2010, Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus prevalence in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or chronic immunomodulatory conditions[3] - (Full text)
  • 2015, Distinct plasma immune signatures in ME/CFS are present early in the course of illness[4] - (Full text)
  • 2015, Findings from a clinical and laboratory database developed for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome[5] - (Abstract)

Clinic location[edit | edit source]

55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114

Phone: (617) 726-3812

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Donna Felsenstein, MD - Infectious Diseases - Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA". www.massgeneral.org. Retrieved Sep 3, 2019. 
  2. 2.02.12.2 "ME/CFS Collaborative Research Center at Harvard, funded by OMF". Open Medicine Foundation. Retrieved Sep 3, 2019. 
  3. Henrich, Timothy J.; Li, Jonathan Z.; Felsenstein, Donna; Kotton, Camille N.; Plenge, Robert M.; Pereyra, Florencia; Marty, Francisco M.; Lin, Nina H.; Grazioso, Paul (Nov 15, 2010). "Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus–Related Virus Prevalence in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Chronic Immunomodulatory Conditions". The Journal of Infectious Diseases. 202 (10): 1478–1481. doi:10.1086/657168. ISSN 0022-1899. PMC 2957553Freely accessible. PMID 20936980. 
  4. Hornig, M; Montoya, JG; Klimas, NG; Levine, SM; Felsenstein, D; Bateman, L; Peterson, DL; Gottschalk, CG; Schultz, AF; Che, X; Eddy, ML; Komaroff, AL; Lipkin, WI (2015). "Distinct plasma immune signatures in ME/CFS are present early in the course of illness". Science Advances. 1 (1). doi:10.1126/sciadv.1400121. 
  5. Klimas, N.G.; Ironson, G.; Carter, A.; Balbin, E.; Bateman, L.; Felsenstein, D.; Levine, S.; Peterson, D.; Chiu, K.; Allen, A.; Cunningham, K.; Gottschalk, C.G.; Fletcher, M; Hornig, M.; Canning, C.; Komaroff, A.L. (2015), "Findings from a clinical and laboratory database developed for discovery of pathogenic mechanisms in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 3 (2): 75-96, doi:10.1080/21641846.2015.1023652 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.