Complement C4a

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Complement C4a is a protein that is expressed, primarily in the liver and in macrophages, in response to acute inflammation or tissue injury.[1]

Relationship to ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Increased C4a levels have been found one to six hours after exercise challenge tests in ME/CFS patients but not in healthy controls.[2] Others found a strong relation between the change in complement C4a level and an increase in post-exertional pain and fatigue in ME/CFS patients.[3] Previously, complement C4a, in combination with other proteins, was being considered as a potential marker of post-exertional malaise in ME/CFS.[4](Full text)

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Behairy BE, El-Mashad GM, Abd-Elghany RS, Ghoneim EM, Sira MM.Serum complement C4a and its relation to liver fibrosis in children with chronic hepatitis C.World J Hepatol. 2013 Aug 27;5(8):445-51.
  2. Sorensen B, Streib JE, Strand M, Make B, Giclas PC, Fleshner M, Jones JF. Complement activation in a model of chronic fatigue syndrome.J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Aug;112(2):397-403. PMID: 12897748
  3. Nijs, J.; Van Oosterwijck, J.; Meeus, M.; Lambrecht, L.; Metzger, K.; Frémont, M.; Paul, L. (2010). "Unravelling the nature of postexertional malaise in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: the role of elastase, complement C4a and interleukin-1β". Journal of Internal Medicine. 267 (4): 418–435. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2009.02178.x. ISSN 1365-2796. 
  4. Sorensen, Bristol; Jones, James F; Vernon, Suzanne D; Rajeevan, Mangalathu S (Jan 2009). "Transcriptional Control of Complement Activation in an Exercise Model of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Molecular Medicine. 15 (1-2): 34–42. doi:10.2119/molmed.2008.00098. PMC 2583111Freely accessible. PMID 19015737. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.