Anxiety

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Anxiety is a general term for several disorders that cause nervousness, fear, apprehension, worrying and unease. A sudden surge of overwhelming anxiety and fear is called a panic attack.

Anxiety symptoms occur with ME/CFS, but their origin tends to be from physiologic problems with the autonomic nervous system, sensory integration, blood flow or blood volume as oppose to emotional or psychiatric factors.[1]

In Dr. David Bell's words: "It is true that many persons with CFS experience anxiety. But because CFS patients tend not to have obvious, diagnosable psychiatric illnesses, I suspect that when panic occurs in CFS patients, the cause is physiological, not psychiatric. Whatever else this disease does to the human brain, it includes agitation in its repertoire."[2]

Some anxiety symptoms in those living with ME/CFS may stem from other factors often encountered by patients, such as feeling ‘delegitimized’ by the medical community,[3] poor prognosis, and loss of income, livelihood, and relationships.

Presentation[edit | edit source]

Prevalence[edit | edit source]

Symptom recognition[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • Anxiety and depression in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): Examining the incidence of health anxiety in CFS/ME[3](Abstract)

Possible causes[edit | edit source]

Potential treatments[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Johnson, Cort (Dec 10, 2016). "The Anxiety Question in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia: Is the Autonomic Nervous System to Blame?". Health Rising. Retrieved Feb 18, 2019. 
  2. David Bell (Aug 30, 2000), Faces of CFS: case studies of chronic fatigue syndrome (print), ISBN 978-0970770202 
  3. 3.03.1 Daniels, J; Brigden, A; Kacorova, A (2017), "Anxiety and depression in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): Examining the incidence of health anxiety in CFS/ME", Psychol Psychother, 90 (3): 502-509, doi:10.1111/papt.12118 
  4. Berne, Katrina (Dec 1, 1995), Running on Empty: The Complete Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFIDS), 2nd ed., Hunter House, p. 60, ISBN 978-0897931915 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.