Alcohol intolerance

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Alcohol intolerance may occur in ME/CFS. It usually develops after the onset of the illness, where the patient was previously able to tolerate alcohol.[1][2][3][4] It may form part of a wider range of allergies and sensitivities that can develop during the course of the illness.[citation needed]

Recovery from CFS/ME is often accompanied by the return of alcohol tolerance.[1]

A 2019 study with Stanford ME/CFS Initiative reported that 66% of subjects meeting the 1994 Fukuda CFS criteria were less able to tolerate alcohol compared to their pre-illness state.[2] This finding replicates those in a 2004 study of patients fulfilling UK criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome referred to a specialist clinic: two-thirds reduced alcohol intake. The most common reasons were increased tiredness after drinking (67%), increased nausea (33%), exacerbated hangovers (23%) and sleep disturbance (24%).[3]

Prevalence[edit | edit source]

  • 1995, Katrina Berne, PhD, reported an estimated prevalence of 45-75% for alcohol intolerance (although she notes that this symptom may be underreported and therefore more prevalent than indicated).[5]
  • 2001, In a Belgian study, 59.5% of patients meeting the Fukuda criteria and 63.7% of patients meeting the Holmes criteria, in a cohort of 2073 CFS patients, reported alcohol intolerance.[4]
  • A 2019 study with Stanford ME/CFS Initiative reported that 66% of subjects meeting the Fukuda 1994 CFS criteria were less able to tolerate alcohol compared to their pre-illness state.[2]

Symptom recognition[edit | edit source]

Research studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2004, Alcohol use in chronic fatigue syndrome[3]

Possible causes[edit | edit source]

Potential treatments[edit | edit source]

If a patient presents with alcohol intolerance, alcohol should be avoided, including that in mouthwashes and herbal tinctures.[citation needed]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 Myhill, Sarah (Sep 21, 2015). "Alcohol intolerance in CFS - gives us a clue as to the mechanisms of fatigue". Prohealth. Retrieved Jul 9, 2019. 
  2. 2.02.12.2 Chu, Lily; Valencia, Ian J.; Garvert, Donn W.; Montoya, Jose G. (Feb 5, 2019). "Onset Patterns and Course of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Frontiers in Pediatrics. 7. doi:10.3389/fped.2019.00012. ISSN 2296-2360. 
  3. 3.03.13.2 Woolley, James; Allen, Roz; Wessely, Simon (Feb 2004). "Alcohol use in chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 56 (2): 203–206. doi:10.1016/S0022-3999(03)00077-1. 
  4. 4.04.1 De Becker, Pascale; McGregor, Neil; De Meirleir, Kenny (December 2001). "A definition‐based analysis of symptoms in a large cohort of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Internal Medicine. 250 (3): 234–240. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2796.2001.00890.x. 
  5. Berne, Katrina (Dec 1, 1995), Running on Empty: The Complete Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFIDS), 2nd ed., Hunter House, p. 58, ISBN 978-0897931915 
  6. Verrillo - Channelopathies
  7. Verrillo - Gut fermentation and small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)
  8. 8.08.18.28.3 Verrillo - Foods to Avoid

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or M.E. has different diagnostic criteria to chronic fatigue syndrome; neurological symptoms are required but fatigue is an optional symptom.<ref name="ICP2011primer">{{Citation

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history