Michael VanElzakker

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Source: tufts.edu

Michael VanElzakker, Phd, is a neuroscientist affiliated at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Tufts University. He has two primary research interests: post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). He has proposed a vagus nerve infection hypothesis (VNIH) for ME/CFS.[1][2]

Dr. VanElzakker current research involves performing brain scans on ME/CFS patients and controls and analyzing the differences.

Education and affiliations[edit | edit source]

Education

  • Univeristy of Colorado at Boulder - Bachelors's and Master's, Psychology/Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Tufts University - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Psychology: Psychiatric neuroscience - 2010 to 2015
  • Harvard Medical School - Post Doctorate - 2015 to Present

Affiliations

  • Neuroendocrinology Lab Manager - University of Colorado August 2004 – May 2010
  • Massachusetts General Hospital - 2010 to Present

Open letter to The Lancet[edit | edit source]

Two open letters to the editor of The Lancet urged the editor to commission a fully independent review of the PACE trial, which the journal had published in 2011. In 2016, Dr. VanElzakker, along with 41 colleagues in the ME/CFS field, signed the second letter.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2013, Chronic fatigue syndrome from vagus nerve infection: A psychoneuroimmunological hypothesis[4] (Full text)
  • 2019, Neuroinflammation and cytokines in myalgic encephalomyelitis/ chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): A critical review of research methods[5] (Full text)

Talks & interviews[edit | edit source]

Quotes[edit | edit source]

Referenced[edit | edit source]

Cognitive behavioral therapy[edit | edit source]

  • On the topic of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): "I understand that this is a really charged topic among CFS advocates, and there is a lot of misinformation out there. Just to be clear, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) does not get at the root cause of CFS. CBT offers coping strategies and is not a cure. But I can’t think of a single medical condition that isn’t exacerbated by stress. CFS is no different. Having a chronic illness is stressful and it makes one’s life complicated and there’s a grieving process. CBT is for those parts of the illness. It’s intended to help people solve problems and to challenge dysfunctional patterns. If you’re seeing a CBT practitioner who views CFS as a psychologically-based illness and is approaching your CBT that way, fire them. Find someone else."[6]

Twitter[edit | edit source]

Cognitive behavioral therapy[edit | edit source]

Vagus nerve infection hypothesis[edit | edit source]

Male and female differences in neuropathic pain[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. VanElzakker, Michael B. (2013). "Chronic fatigue syndrome from vagus nerve infection: a psychoneuroimmunological hypothesis". Medical Hypotheses. 81 (3): 414–423. doi:10.1016/j.mehy.2013.05.034. ISSN 1532-2777. PMID 23790471. 
  2. VanElzakker, Michael (Jun 23, 2013). "VanElzakker VNIH CFS in press.pdf". PDF Archive. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  3. Tuller, David (Feb 10, 2016). "An open letter to The Lancet, again". www.virology.ws. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  4. VanElzakker, Michael B. "Chronic fatigue syndrome from vagus nerve infection:A psychoneuroimmunological hypothesis". Medical Hypotheses. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  5. VanElzakker, Michael B.; Brumfield, Sydney A.; Mejia, Paula S. Lara (Jan 10, 2019). "Neuroinflammation and cytokines in myalgic encephalomyelitis/ chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): A critical review of research methods". Frontiers in Neurology. doi:10.3389/fneur.2018.01033. 
  6. 6.06.1 Johnson, Cort (Feb 14, 2014). "Michael VanElzakker Ph.d Talks – About the Vagus Nerve Infection Hypothesis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) - Simmaron Research". Simmaron Research. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  7. Ykelenstam, Yasmina (Dec 8, 2015). "Harvard neuroscientist Dr. Michael Van ElZakker: chronic fatigue vagus nerve link | Healing Histamine". Healing Histamine. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  8. Ykelenstam, Yasmina (Dec 7, 2015). "Yasmina Ykelenstam's Healing Histamine Podcast: Chronic Fatigue from Vagus Nerve Infection: A Psychoneuroimmunological Hypothesis". thelowhistaminechefpodcast.libsyn.com. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  9. 9.09.1 S, Jaime (Dec 12, 2016). "Dr VanElzakker: two new ME/CFS studies at Harvard - #MEAction". #MEAction. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  10. Proal, Amy (Dec 7, 2017). "Interview with neuroscientist Michael VanElzakker: Vagus Nerve, ME/CFS, latent infection and more | Microbe Minded". microbeminded.com. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  11. King, Llewellyn (Mar 30, 2018). "ME/CFS Research with Michael VanElzakker, Vagus Nerve, triggers | ME/CFS Alert Episode 97". YouTube. 
  12. Jenson, Gregory (Dec 13, 2016). "CFS correspondence on the Department's view of the PACE trial - cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth i". WhatDoTheyKnow. Dr Michael VanElzakker. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  13. Van Elzakker, Michael (Aug 16, 2016). "Michael VanElzakker on Twitter". Twitter. 3:36 PM. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  14. Van Elzakker, Michael (Apr 8, 2014). "Michael VanElzakker on Twitter". Twitter. 7:31 AM. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  15. VanElzakker, Michael (Sep 13, 2016). "Michael VanElzakker on Twitter". Twitter. 7:31 PM. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 
  16. 16.016.1 Dodds, KN; Beckett, EAH; Evans, SF; Grace, PM; Watkins, LR; Hutchinson, MR (2016). "Glial contributions to visceral pain: implications for disease etiology and the female predominance of persistent pain" (PDF). www.nature.com. 
  17. VanElzakker, Michael (Sep 15, 2016). "Michael VanElzakker on Twitter". Twitter. 12:43 PM. Retrieved Oct 14, 2018. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome

Cognitive behavioral therapy[citation needed]


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history