Lynette Hodges

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Dr Lynette Hodges is a cardiovascular exercise and health researcher and Senior Lecturer at the School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition, at Massey University, New Zealand.[1]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2021, Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[2] - (Full text)
  • 2021, Relationship between cardiopulmonary, mitochondrial and autonomic nervous system function improvement after an individualised activity programme upon Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients[3] - (Full text)
  • 2020, Prediction of Discontinuation of Structured Exercise Programme in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patient[4] - (Full text)
  • 2020, The physiological time line of post-exertional malaise in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)[5] - (Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

  • 2020, Conference Oral Presentation: The effects of post exertional malaise on markers of arterial stiffness|location=Presented at Clinical Exercise Physiology New Zealand.[6] Authored by: Hodges, L.
Background and objective: Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterised by post-exertional malaise (PEM) following exercise. Evidence is emerging that ME/CFS patients suffer from chronic vascular dysfunction as a result of illness-related oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. The study aimed to determine whether a single bout of maximal-intensity aerobic exercise would have a negative impact on vascular function 48 and 72 hours into recovery, to investigate whether PEM impacted these measures.
Materials and Methods: ME/CFS (n=11) with gender and age-matched controls (n=11) were randomly assigned to either a 48-hour or 72-hour protocol. After 10 minutes of supine rest, each participant had measures of brachial blood pressure, augmentation index (AIx, standardized to 75bpm) and carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) taken. This was followed by completing a maximal incremental cycle exercise test. Resting measures were repeated 48 or 72 hours later (depending on group allocation), to determine the effects of the exercise undertaken.
Results: No significant differences were found when ME/CFS were directly compared to controls at baseline. During recovery, the 48-hour control group experienced a significant 7.2% reduction in AIx from baseline measures (p<0.05), while the matched ME/CFS experienced no change in AIx. The 72-hour ME/CFS group experienced a non-significant increase of 1.4% from baseline measures. The 48 hour and 72-hour ME/CFS groups both experienced non-significant improvements in crPWV (0.56ms-1 and 1.55ms-1, respectively).
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that those with ME/CFS may not experience exercise-induced vasodilation due to chronic vascular damage, and may be a contributor to the onset of PEM. This may help determine cardiovascular risk for this illness, as well as validating our measuring methods as potential diagnostic tools for ME/CFS. Further research on a greater scale is required to validate these claims.

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
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  • Institution
  • Website
  • YouTube
  • Address:
School of Sport, Exercise and Nutrition, at
Massey University
Palmerston North 4442
New Zealand

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Massey University, New Zealand. "Dr Lynette Hodges - Senior Lecturer - Massey University". www.massey.ac.nz. Retrieved May 26, 2022.
  2. Bond, Joshua; Nielsen, Tessa; Hodges, Lynette (2021). "Effects of Post-Exertional Malaise on Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 18 (5): 2366. doi:10.3390/ijerph18052366. ISSN 1660-4601. PMC 7957494. PMID 33671082.
  3. Kujawski, Sławomir; Cossington, Jo; Słomko, Joanna; Zawadka-Kunikowska, Monika; Tafil-Klawe, Małgorzata; Klawe, Jacek; Buszko, Katarzyna; Jakovljevic, Djordje; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Morten, Karl J.; Dawes, Helen; Strong, James W. L.; Murovska, Modra; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Estevez-Lopez, Fernando; Newton, Julia L.; Hodges, Lynette; Zalewski, Paweł; European Network on ME/CFS, (EUROMENE) (April 6, 2021). "Relationship between Cardiopulmonary, Mitochondrial and Autonomic Nervous System Function Improvement after an Individualised Activity Programme upon Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients". Journal of Clinical Medicine. 10 (7): 1542. doi:10.3390/jcm10071542. ISSN 2077-0383.
  4. Kujawski, Sławomir; Cossington, Jo; Słomko, Joanna; Dawes, Helen; Strong, James W.L.; Estevez-Lopez, Fernando; Murovska, Modra; Newton, Julia L.; Hodges, Lynette (October 26, 2020). "Prediction of Discontinuation of Structured Exercise Programme in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients". Journal of Clinical Medicine. 9 (11): 3436. doi:10.3390/jcm9113436. ISSN 2077-0383. PMC 7693605. PMID 33114704.
  5. Hodges, Lynette; Nielsen, Tessa; Cochrane, Darryl; Baken, Donald (May 2020). "The physiological time line of post‐exertional malaise in Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)". Translational Sports Medicine. 3 (3): 243–249. doi:10.1002/tsm2.133. ISSN 2573-8488.
  6. Bond, J.; Hodges, L. (September 2020), The effects of post exertional malaise on markers of arterial stiffness, Presented at Clinical Exercise Physiology New Zealand. Virtual Zoom Conference.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E.) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

mitochondria Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

post-exertional malaise (PEM) - A notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small physical or cognitive exertions. PEM may be referred to as a "crash" or "collapse" and can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain, trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, and others.

post-exertional malaise (PEM) - A notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small physical or cognitive exertions. PEM may be referred to as a "crash" or "collapse" and can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain, trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, and others.

post-exertional malaise (PEM) - A notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small physical or cognitive exertions. PEM may be referred to as a "crash" or "collapse" and can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain, trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, and others.

supine lying on the back or with the face upward

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