Jay Goldstein

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Dr. Jay A. Goldstein was a prominent ME/CFS clinician and researcher located in southern California, USA. Trained as a psychiatrist, he taught at the University of California, Irvine. He was director of the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Institutes of Anaheim Hills and Beverly Hills. He organized a symposium in Los Angeles on CFIDS and fibromyalgia. When Stephen Straus, in 1989, published that CFS was likely a psychiatric illness, Jay Goldstein vehemently criticized Straus's work, saying "To be quite frank, I could not believe a research paper could be this bad and be published."[1]

Books[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1995, The Assessment of Vascular Abnormalities in Late Life Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Brain SPECT: Comparison with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder[4](Abstract)
  • 2000, The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Related Neurosomatic Disorders[5]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Johnson, Hillary (2006). Osler's Web (2nd ed.). iUniverse, Inc. 
  2. Goldstein, Jay A. (1993). Chronic Fatigue Syndromes: The Limbic Hypothesis. Haworth Medical Press. ISBN 978-1-56024-433-2. 
  3. Goldstein, Jay A. (2004). Tuning the Brain: Principles and Practice of Neurosomatic Medicine. Haworth Press. ISBN 978-0-7890-2246-2. 
  4. Goldstein, Jay A.; Mena, Ismael; Jouanne, Eugenio; Lesser, Ira (1995), "The Assessment of Vascular Abnormalities in Late Life Chronic Fatigue Syndrome by Brain SPECT: Comparison with Late Life Major Depressive Disorder", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 1 (1): 55-79, doi:10.1300/J092v01n01_05 
  5. Jay A. Goldstein. (2000). The Pathophysiology of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Related Neurosomatic Disorders. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, pp. 83-91. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v06n02_09

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) - Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome is another term for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but one which emphasizes the immunological aspects of the disease. Popular in the 1990's, this term has apparently fallen into disuse.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.