James Baraniuk

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search
Source:www.prohealth.com

James Nicholas Baraniuk, MD, is an Associate Professor with Tenure in the Department of Medicine at Georgetown University[1] and the Director of the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center, located within the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. The Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center does research on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), Gulf War Illness (GWI) and other pain conditions, particularly in the areas of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), biomarker discovery through proteomic, metabolomic, and transcriptomic assays in blood and cereobrospinal fluid, autonomic testing and heart rate variability (HRV) and statistical analyses using machine learning, hierarchical clustering, and other data mining methods.[2]

Education[edit | edit source]

  • 1972-1976 - B. Sc. (Hons.), Joint Honours in Chemistry and Microbiology, Dean's Honour List, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 1977-1981 - M. D., University of Manitoba
  • 1978-1979 - B. Sc. (Medicine), University of Manitoba
  • 1981-1982 - Internship, Saint Thomas Hospital Medical Center, Akron, Ohio
  • 1982-1984 - Internal Medicine Resident, Saint Thomas Hospital Medical Center, Akron, Ohio
  • 1984-1985 - Senior Assistant Resident in Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
  • 1985-1987 - Fellowship in Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Duke University Medical Center

Positions of employment[edit | edit source]

  • 1987-1989 - Adjunct Scientist, Allergy Disease Section, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD
  • 1989-1991 - Visiting Clinical Scientist, Thoracic Medicine Department, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, England
  • 1991-present - Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

ME/CFS Common Data Element (CDE) Project[edit | edit source]

Member of the Neurologic/Cognitive/CNS Imaging Working Group of the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Common Data Element (CDE) Project sponsored by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).[3]

Physician guide[edit | edit source]

  • 2018 - Authored the update to BMJ Best Practice: Chronic fatigue syndrome/Myalgic encephalomyelitis[4]

Notable studies related to ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

  • 1998, IgE Concentrations in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[5]
  • 2000, Irritant Rhinitis in Allergic, Nonallergic, Control and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Populations[6]
  • 2000, Tobacco Sensitivity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)[7](Abstract)
  • 2002, Differences in Baseline Nasal Secretions Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Control Subjects[8]
  • 2002, Cytokines in nasal lavage fluids from acute sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, and chronic fatigue syndrome subjects.[9](Abstract)
  • 2005, A Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - related proteome in human cerebrospinal fluid.[10](Full Text)
  • 2010, Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer (Full Text)[11]
  • 2011, Migraine headaches in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS): comparison of two prospective cross-sectional studies.[12]
  • 2012, No serological evidence for a role of HHV-6 infection in chronic fatigue syndrome[13](Full text)
  • 2012, Dyspnea in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Comparison of Two Prospective Cross-Sectional Studies.[14] - (Full Text)
  • 2013, Increased Brain White Matter Axial Diffusivity Associated with Fatigue, Pain and Hyperalgesia in Gulf War Illness[15](Full Text)
  • 2013, Migraine in gulf war illness and chronic fatigue syndrome: Prevalence, potential mechanisms, and evaluation.[16](Full Text)
  • 2013, A Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) severity score based on case designation criteria.[17](Full Text)
  • 2017, Exercise-induced changes in cerebrospinal fluid miRNAs in Gulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and sedentary control subjects[18](Full Text) (Author Correction)[19]
  • 2019, Chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department[20](Full text)
  • 2019, Orthostatic intolerance in chronic fatigue syndrome[21] (Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Advocacy[edit | edit source]

Open letter to The Lancet[edit | edit source]

Dr Baraniuk signed two open letters to the editor of The Lancet urging the editor to commission a fully independent review of the PACE trial, which the journal published in 2011.

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://explore.georgetown.edu/people/baraniuj/
  2. https://sites.google.com/a/georgetown.edu/baraniuklab/home
  3. "Complete Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome CDE Roster". NIH. Retrieved Oct 11, 2019. 
  4. "Chronic fatigue syndrome/Myalgic encephalomyelitis - Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment | BMJ Best Practice". bestpractice.bmj.com. Retrieved Sep 14, 2018. 
  5. Baraniuk, James N.; Clauw, Daniel; Macdowellcarneiro, Anna-Louisa; Bellanti, Joseph; Pandiri, Pavani; Foong, Sukmun; Ali, Mushtaq (Jan 1998). "IgE Concentrations in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. 4 (1): 13–21. doi:10.1300/j092v04n01_03. ISSN 1057-3321. 
  6. Baraniuk, James N.; Naranch, Kristina; Maibach, Hilda; Clauw, Daniel J. (2000), "Irritant Rhinitis in Allergic, Nonallergic, Control and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Populations", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 7 (2): 3-31, doi:10.1300/J092v07n02_02 
  7. Baraniuk, James N.; Naranch, Kristina; Maibach, Hilda; Clauw, Daniel J. (2000), "Tobacco Sensitivity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 7 (2): 33-52, doi:10.1300/J092v07n02_03 
  8. K. Naranch, S. M. Repka-Ramirez, Y.-J. Park, A. Velarde, R. Finnegan, J. Murray, A. Pheiffer, E. Hwang, D. Clauw & J. N. Baraniuk. (2002). Differences in Baseline Nasal Secretions Between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Control Subjects. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 10, Iss. 1, pp. 3-15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v10n01_02
  9. Repka-Ramirez, Susana; Naranch, Kristina; Park, Yong-Jin; Clauw, Daniel; Baraniuk, James N. (May 2002). "Cytokines in nasal lavage fluids from acute sinusitis, allergic rhinitis, and chronic fatigue syndrome subjects". Allergy and Asthma Proceedings. 23 (3): 185–190. ISSN 1088-5412. PMID 12125506. 
  10. Baraniuk, J.N.; Casado, B.; Maibach, H.; Clauw, D.H.; Pannell, L.K.; Hess, S.A. (2005), "Chronic fatigue syndrome – related proteome in human cerebrospinal fluid", BMC Neurology, 5 (22), doi:10.1186/1471-2377-5-22 
  11. Baraniuk JN. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer. Current allergy and asthma reports. 2010;10(3):210-214. doi:10.1007/s11882-010-0106-2.
  12. Ravindran, Murugan K; Zheng, Yin; Timbol, Christian; Merck, Samantha J; Baraniuk, James N (Mar 5, 2011). "Migraine headaches in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Comparison of two prospective cross-sectional studies". BMC Neurology. 11 (1). doi:10.1186/1471-2377-11-30. ISSN 1471-2377. PMID 21375763. 
  13. Burbelo, Peter D.; Bayat, Ahmad; Wagner, Jason; Nutman, Thomas B.; Baraniuk, James N.; Iadarola, Michael J. (2012). "No serological evidence for a role of HHV-6 infection in chronic fatigue syndrome". American Journal of Translational Research. 4 (4): 443–451. ISSN 1943-8141. PMC 3493030Freely accessible. PMID 23145212. 
  14. Ravindran, Murugan; Adewuyi, Oluwatoyin; Zheng, Yin; Rayhan, Rakib U.; Le, Uyenphuong; Timbol, Christian; Merck, Samantha; Esteitie, Rania; Read, Charles; Baraniuk, James (Dec 12, 2012). "Dyspnea in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Comparison of Two Prospective Cross-Sectional Studies". Global Journal of Health Science. 5 (2). doi:10.5539/gjhs.v5n2p94. ISSN 1916-9744. 
  15. Rayhan RU, Stevens BW, Timbol CR, Adewuyi O, Walitt B, VanMeter JW, Baraniuk JN. (2013) Increased Brain White Matter Axial Diffusivity Associated with Fatigue, Pain and Hyperalgesia in Gulf War Illness. PLoS ONE 8(3): e58493. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0058493
  16. Rayhan, R. U., Ravindran, M. K., & Baraniuk, J. N. (2013). Migraine in gulf war illness and chronic fatigue syndrome: Prevalence, potential mechanisms, and evaluation. Frontiers in Physiology, 4. doi:10.3389/fphys.2013.00181. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23898301.
  17. Baraniuk JN, Adewuyi O, Merck SJ, Ali M, Ravindran MK, Timbol CR, Rayhan R, Zheng Y, Le U, Esteitie R, Petrie KN.(2013). A Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) severity score based on case designation criteria. American Journal of Translational Research, 5(1):53-68
  18. Baraniuk, J.N.; Shivapurkar, N. (2017), "Exercise – induced changes in cerebrospinal fluid miRNAs in Gulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and sedentary control subjects", Scientific Reports, 7 (15338), doi:10.1038/s41598-017-15383-9 
  19. Baraniuk, James N.; Shivapurkar, Narayan (Apr 19, 2018). "Author Correction: Exercise – induced changes in cerebrospinal fluid miRNAs in Gulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and sedentary control subjects". Scientific Reports. 8 (1). doi:10.1038/s41598-018-23238-0. ISSN 2045-2322. PMID 29674668. 
  20. Baraniuk, James N.; Timbol, Christian R. (Jan 11, 2019). "Chronic fatigue syndrome in the emergency department". Open Access Emergency Medicine. doi:10.2147/oaem.s176843. Retrieved Jan 19, 2019. 
  21. Garner, Richard; Baraniuk, James N. (Dec 2019). "Orthostatic intolerance in chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Translational Medicine. 17 (1). doi:10.1186/s12967-019-1935-y. ISSN 1479-5876. 
  22. Tuller, David (Feb 10, 2016). "An open letter to The Lancet, again". 
  23. Tuller, David (Jun 19, 2018). "Trial By Error: An Open Letter to The Lancet, Two Years On". 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

assay - 1. (verb) analysis (as of an ore or drug) to determine the presence, absence, or quantity of one or more components. 2. (noun) In biochemistry, any laboratory protocol used to test a sample for one or more qualities.

heart rate variability (HRV) - A measurement of the variability of the heart rate over time. When the heart rate is consistent, there will be a low heart rate variability. When the heart rate is constantly changing, there will be a high heart rate variability. Heart rate variability is often used by ME/CFS patients to monitor their autonomic nervous system, as high heart rate variability is associated with the sympathetic nervous system and low heart rate variability is associated with the parasympathetic nervous system.

cognition - Thought processes, including attention, reasoning, and memory.

central nervous system (CNS) - One of the two parts of the human nervous system, the other part being the peripheral nervous system. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord, while the peripheral nervous system consists of nerves that travel from the central nervous system into the various organs and tissues of the body.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

orthostatic intolerance (OI) - The development of symptoms when standing upright, where symptoms are relieved upon reclining. Patients with orthostatic intolerance have trouble remaining upright for more than a few seconds or a few minutes, depending upon severity. In severe orthostatic intolerance, patients may not be able to sit upright in bed. Orthostatic intolerance is often a sign of dysautonomia. There are different types of orthostatic intolerance, including postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

tachycardia - An unusually rapid heart beat. Can be caused by exercise or illness. A symptom of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). (Learn more: www.heart.org)

National Institutes of Health (NIH) - A set of biomedical research institutes operated by the U.S. government, under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.