Charles Lapp

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Source: Hunter-Hopkins Center

Charles W. Lapp, MD, is an Internist and Medical Director at Hunter-Hopkins Center in Charlotte, NC with a practice specializing in ME/CFS, FM, and related conditions. Earlier in his career, he practiced family medicine and pediatrics in Raleigh, NC.[1] He became interested in ME/CFS following an outbreak of three small epidemics of a chronic fatiguing illness in the Raleigh area. One of these outbreaks was among all the members of the N.C. Symphony Orchestra.

"Patients started coming to me with persistent flulike symptoms[...]They would work one day and have to sleep for two. Perfectly well-adjusted people became disabled almost overnight.”[2]

From 1992 to 1995 Dr. Lapp acted as Medical Director of the Cheney Clinic in Charlotte, in collaboration with Dr. Paul Cheney. In August 1995, Dr. Lapp opened the Hunter-Hopkins Center.[3] His center does testing for disability insurance such as the 2-day Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and a Computer-assisted cognitive function test.

He is currently in practice with Dr. Laura Black.[4]

Awards[edit]

  • 2009, Nelson Gantz Outstanding Clinician Award awarded to a physician who emulates Nelson Gantz's clinical acumen, his passion for medicine, and his empathy for persons with CFS/FM awarded by IACFS/ME[5]

Pediatric Case Definition[edit]

  • 2006, "A Pediatric Case Definition for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"
    "Summary: For a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), most researchers use criteria that were developed by Fukuda et al. (1994), with modifications suggested by Reeves et al. (2003). However, this case definition was established for adults rather than children. A Canadian Case Definition (ME/CFS; Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/CFS) has recently been developed, with more specific inclusion criteria (Carruthers et al., 2003). Again, the primary aim of this case definition is to diagnose adult CFS. A significant problem in the literature is the lack of both a pediatric definition of ME/CFS and a reliable instrument to assess it. These deficiencies can lead to criterion variance problems resulting in studies labeling children with a wide variety of symptoms as having ME/CFS. Subsequently, comparisons between articles become more difficult, decreasing the possibility of conducting a meta-analysis. This article presents recommendations developed by the International Association of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Pediatric Case Definition Working group for a ME/CFS pediatric case definition. It is hoped that this pediatric case definition will lead to more appropriate identification of children and adolescents with ME/CFS."[6]

Clinical Trials[edit]

The Hunter-Hopkins Center is currently one of two clinical sites participating in the Hemispherx Biopharma 511/open label Ampligen trials to gain FDA approval. Ampligen is an IV medication given twice weekly in the Hunter-Hopkins infusion room. For more information in this program please see this link: Ampligen study at Hunter-Hopkins.[7]

Clinic location[edit]

  • Hunter-Hopkins Center
  • 7421 Carmel Executive Park Dr.
  • Charlotte, North Carolina 28226
  • Telephone: (704) 543-9692
  • Email: drlapp@drlapp.net

Notable Studies[edit]

  • 2016, CDC Grand Rounds: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome — Advancing Research and Clinical Education. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report[8]
  • 2012, A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial of the TLR-3 agonist rintatolimod in severe cases of chronic fatigue syndrome.
    Abstract: "A Phase III prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial comparing twice weekly IV rintatolimod versus placebo was conducted in 234 subjects with long-standing, debilitating CFS/ME at 12 sites. The primary endpoint was the intra-patient change from baseline at Week 40 in exercise tolerance (ET). Secondary endpoints included concomitant drug usage, the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Vitality Score (SF 36). Subjects receiving rintatolimod for 40 weeks improved intra-patient placebo-adjusted ET 21.3% (p = 0.047) from baseline in an intention-to-treat analysis. Correction for subjects with reduced dosing compliance increased placebo-adjusted ET improvement to 28% (p = 0.022). The improvement observed represents approximately twice the minimum considered medically significant by regulatory agencies. The rintatolimod cohort vs. placebo also reduced dependence on drugs commonly used by patients in an attempt to alleviate the symptoms of CFS/ME (p = 0.048). Placebo subjects crossed-over to receive rintatolimod demonstrated an intra-patient improvement in ET performance at 24 weeks of 39% (p = 0.04). Rintatolimod at 400 mg twice weekly was generally well-tolerated.[9]
  • 1997, Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Children: A Practicing Clinician's Approach[10]

Talks & interviews[edit]

HHS/CFSAC Testimony[edit]

Open Letter to The Lancet[edit]

Two open letters to the editor of The Lancet urged the editor to commission a fully independent review of the PACE trial, which the journal had published in 2011. In 2016, Dr. Lapp, along with 42 colleagues in the ME/CFS field, signed the second letter.

Online presence[edit]

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. http://drlapp.com/staff/
  2. http://newsok.com/article/3366622 "Cause of illness remains unknown," By Karen Garloch Published: May 5, 2009
  3. http://drlapp.com/staff/
  4. http://drlapp.com/staff/
  5. http://iacfsme.org/Organization/Former-IACFS-ME-Awardees.aspx
  6. Jason, Leonard A; Jordan, Karen; Miike, Teruhisa; Bell, David S; Lapp, Charles; Torres-Harding, Susan; Rowe, Kathy; Gurwitt, Alan; De Meirleir, Kenny; Van Hoof, Elke LS (2006), "A Pediatric Case Definition for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 13 (2-3): 1-44, doi:10.1300/J092v13n02_01 
  7. http://drlapp.com/research/
  8. Unger, ER; Lin, JS; Brimmer, DJ; Lapp, CW; Komaroff, AL; Nath, A; Laird, S; Iskander, J (2016), "CDC Grand Rounds: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome — Advancing Research and Clinical Education", Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 65 (5051): 1434–1438, doi:10.15585/mmwr.mm655051a4 
  9. Strayer, DR; Carter, WA; Stouch, BC; Stevens, SR; Bateman, L; Cimoch, PJ; Lapp, CW; Peterson, DL; Chronic Fatigue Syndrome AMP-516 Study Group; Mitchell, WM (2012), "A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial of the TLR-3 agonist rintatolimod in severe cases of chronic fatigue syndrome.", PLoS One, 7 (3): e31334, PMID 22431963, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031334 
  10. Charles W. Lapp. (1997). Management of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Children: A Practicing Clinician's Approach. Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 3, Iss. 2, pp 59-76. http://dx.doi.org/10.1300/J092v03n02_07


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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history