Warren Tate

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Dr Warren P. Tate, CNZM FNZIC FRSNZ MA-PIMBN, is a New Zealand biochemist and Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Otago, New Zealand.[1] Emeritus Prof Warren Tate, though officially retired, is continuing his molecular-level research into myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome at the university. His daughter Katherine was diagnosed with ME/CFS in the early 1990s.[2][3]

In 2013, Warren Tate and PhD student Angus Mackay received funding from the Lottery Health Research grants to support their search for a diagnostic blood test for ME/CFS.[4]

Awards[edit | edit source]

  • 1992, received an International Research Scholar award from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of the United States — one of only two New Zealanders to receive the award[2]
  • 2010, awarded the Rutherford Medal by the Royal Society of New Zealand, the country’s top science honour[2]
  • 2011, made a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to science[2]
  • 2018, awarded the Marsden Medal by the New Zealand Association of Scientists[2]

Research studies and publications[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, A compromised paraventricular nucleus within a dysfunctional hypothalamus: A novel neuroinflammatory paradigm for ME/CFS[5] - (Full text)
  • 2019, Changes in the transcriptome of circulating immune cells of a New Zealand cohort with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome[6] - (Full text)
  • 2019, Current Research Provides Insight into the Biological Basis and Diagnostic Potential for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)[7] - (Full text)
  • 2020, A SWATH-MS analysis of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome peripheral blood mononuclear cell proteomes reveals mitochondrial dysfunction[8] - (Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

News articles[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Professor Warren Tate profile at University of Otago". 
  2. 2.02.12.22.32.4 "Covid-19 could lead to 'explosion' in Tapanui flu cases". Otago Daily Times Online News. Aug 3, 2020. Retrieved Aug 4, 2020. 
  3. Mackenzie, Dene (May 26, 2018). "Set on a quest to treat ME". Otago Daily Times Online News. Retrieved Sep 27, 2020. 
  4. "Otago Daily Times". 
  5. Mackay, Angus; Tate, Warren P. (Dec 2018). "A compromised paraventricular nucleus within a dysfunctional hypothalamus: A novel neuroinflammatory paradigm for ME/CFS". International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology. doi:10.1177/2058738418812342. 
  6. Sweetman, Eiren; Ryan, Margaret; Edgar, Christina; Mackay, Angus; Vallings, Rosamund; Tate, Warren (Jan 2019). "Changes in the transcriptome of circulating immune cells of a New Zealand cohort with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome". International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology. 33. doi:10.1177/2058738418820402. 
  7. Sweetman, Eiren; Noble, Alex; Edgar, Christina; Mackay, Angus; Helliwell, Amber; Vallings, Rosamund; Ryan, Margaret; Tate, Warren (Jul 10, 2019). "Current Research Provides Insight into the Biological Basis and Diagnostic Potential for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)". Diagnostics. 9 (3): 73. doi:10.3390/diagnostics9030073. ISSN 2075-4418. 
  8. Sweetman, Eiren; Kleffmann, Torsten; Edgar, Christina; de Lange, Michel; Vallings, Rosamund; Tate, Warren (Sep 24, 2020). "A SWATH-MS analysis of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome peripheral blood mononuclear cell proteomes reveals mitochondrial dysfunction". Journal of Translational Medicine. 18 (1): 365. doi:10.1186/s12967-020-02533-3. ISSN 1479-5876. PMC 7512220Freely accessible. 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

α - Greek letter alpha or alfa (symbol)

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue (idiopathic chronic fatigue) without additional symptoms. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.