Short Form 36-Item Health Survey

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Short Form 36-Item Health Survey or SF-36 is a patient-reported health measure that assesses health-related quality of life in 8 areas: 1) limitations in physical activities because of health problems; 2) limitations in social activities because of physical or emotional problems; 3) limitations in usual role activities because of physical health problems; 4) bodily pain; 5) general mental health; 6) limitations in usual role activities because of emotional problems; 7) vitality (energy and fatigue); and 8) general health perceptions.[1] A score of zero represents completely disability, and a score of 100 no disability.

SF-36 was used in the PACE trial and many other ME/CFS trials, such as the CDC's Wichita Clinical Study[2] and the Ampligen AMP-516 clinical trial.[3]

Studies[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.cdc.gov/cfs/pdf/wichita-data-access/sf36-doc.pdf
  2. http://www.cdc.gov/cfs/programs/wichita-data-access/
  3. http://simmaronresearch.com/category/ampligen/
  4. Jason, LA; Evans, M; Brown, M; Porter, N; Brown, A; Hunnell, J; Anderson, V; Lerch, A (2011), "Fatigue Scales and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Issues of Sensitivity and Specificity", Disability Studies Quarterly: DSQ, 31 (1): 1375, PMID 21966179
  5. Murdock, KW; Wang, XS; Shi, Q; Cleeland, CS; Fagundes, CP; Vernon, Suzanne D. (2016), "The utility of patient-reported outcome measures among patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.", Quality of Life Research, doi:10.1007/s11136-016-1406-3, PMID 27600520

Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) - A 36-item patient-reported questionnaire, used to determine patient health status and quality of life.

subjective outcome An outcome of a clinical trial that depends on the judgement or opinion of the assessor or patient, e.g. asking if fatigue has increased or decreased "a little" or "a lot", patient questionnaires like the Chalder Fatigue Scale, and other patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs).

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.