Molly Brown

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Source:DePaul

Molly M. Brown, PhD in Psychology, is an Assistant Professor, Clinical-Community Psychology​, College of Science and Health, De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois.

Open letters[edit | edit source]

Notable studies on ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

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References[edit | edit source]

  1. Jason, Leonard A.; Torres-Harding, Susan; Maher, Kevin; Reynolds, Nadia; Brown, Molly; Sorenson, Matthew; Donalek, Julie; Corradi, Karina; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Lu, Tony (2007), "Baseline Cortisol Levels Predict Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Nonpharmacologic Clinical Trial", Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, 14 (4): 39-59, doi:10.3109/10573320802092039 
  2. Brown, MM; Jason, LA (2007), "Functioning in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome: increased impairment with co-occurring multiple chemical sensitivity and fibromyalgia", Dynamic Medicine, 6 (6), doi:10.1186/1476-5918-6-6, PMID 17540028 
  3. Jason, LA; Torres-Harding, S; Friedberg, F; Corradi, K; Njoku, MG; Donalek, J; Reynolds, N; Brown, M; Weitner, BB; Rademaker, A; Papernik, M (2007), "Non-pharmacologic interventions for CFS: a randomized trial", Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 14 (4): 275–296, doi:10.1007/s10880-007-9090-7 
  4. Torres-Harding, Susan; Sorenson, Matthew; Jason, Leonard; Maher, Kevin; Fletcher, Mary Ann; Reynolds, Nadia; Brown, Molly (2008), "The associations between basal salivary cortisol and illness symptomatology in chronic fatigue syndrome", Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research, 2008 (13): 157-180, PMID 19701493 
  5. Reynolds, Nadia L; Brown, Molly M; Jason, LA (2009), "The relationship of Fennell phases to symptoms among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome", Evaluation & the Health Professions, 32 (3): 264-80, doi:10.1177/0163278709338558, PMID 19696083 
  6. Jason, L.A.; Timpo, P.; Porter, N.; Herrington, J.; Brown, M.; Torres-Harding, S.; Friedberg, F. (2009), "Activity logs as a measure of daily activity among patients with CFS.", Journal of Mental Health, 18 (6): 549-556, doi:10.3109/09638230903191249, PMID 24222721 
  7. Jason, Leonard A.; Porter, Nicole; Brown, Molly; Anderson, Valerie; Brown, Abigail; Hunnell, Jessica; Lerch, Athena (2009). "CFS: A Review of Epidemiology and Natural History Studies". Bulletin of the IACFS/ME. 17 (3): 88–106. PMID 21243091. 
  8. Jason, Leonard; Sorenson, Matthew; Porter, Nicole; Brown, Molly; Lerch, Athena; Van der Eb, Constance; Mikovits, Judy (2010), "Possible Genetic Dysregulation in Pediatric CFS", Psychology, 1 (4): 247-251, doi:10.4236/psych.2010.14033 
  9. Jason, LA; Evans, M; Brown, M; Porter, N (2010), "What is fatigue? Pathological and nonpathological fatigue", PM&R, 2 (5): 327-31, doi:10.1016/j.pmrj.2010.03.028 
  10. Brown, Molly M.; Brown, Abigail A.; Jason, Leonard A. (2010), "Illness duration and coping style in chronic fatigue syndrome", Psychological Reports, 106 (2): 383–393, doi:10.2466/PR0.106.2.383-393, PMID 20524538 
  11. Brown, Molly; Khorana, Neha; Jason, Leonard A. (2010). "The role of changes in activity as a function of perceived available and expended energy in nonpharmacological treatment outcomes for ME/CFS". Journal of Clinical Psychology. 67 (3): 253–260. doi:10.1002/jclp.20744. ISSN 0021-9762. PMID 21254053. 
  12. Hlavaty, Laura E.; Brown, Molly M.; Jason, Leonard A. (2011), "The Effect of Homework Compliance on Treatment Outcomes for Participants with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Rehabilitation Psychology, 56 (3): 212–218, doi:10.1037/a0024118 
  13. Jason, LA; Evans, M; Brown, M; Porter, N; Brown, A; Hunnell, J; Anderson, V; Lerch, A (2011), "Fatigue Scales and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Issues of Sensitivity and Specificity", Disability Studies Quarterly: DSQ, 31 (1): 1375, PMID 21966179 
  14. Brown, Molly M.; Bell, David S.; Jason, Leonard A.; Christos, Constance; Bell, David E. (2012), "Understanding long-term outcomes of chronic fatigue syndrome.", Journal of Clinical Psychology, 68 (9): 1028-35, doi:10.1002/jclp.21880 
  15. Jason, Leonard A.; Brown, Abigail; Clyne, Erin; Bartgis, Lindsey; Evans, Meredyth; Brown, Molly (September 2012), "Contrasting case definitions for chronic fatigue syndrome, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and myalgic encephalomyelitis", Evaluation & the Health Professions, 35 (3): 280–304, doi:10.1177/0163278711424281, ISSN 1552-3918, PMID 22158691 
  16. Brown, M; Kaplan, C; Jason, L (2012), "Factor analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II with patients with chronic fatigue syndrome", Journal of Health Psychology, 17 (6): 799-808, doi:10.1177/1359105311424470 
  17. Jason, Leonard A.; Brown, Molly; Evans, Meredyth; Brown, Abigail (Oct 2012). "Predictors of Fatigue among Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment. 22 (7): 822–832. doi:10.1080/10911359.2012.707896. ISSN 1091-1359. PMC 3955704Freely accessible. PMID 24643250. 
  18. Jason, LA; Brown, M; Brown, A; Evans, M; Flores, S; Grant-Holler, E; Sunnquist, M (2013), "Energy conservation/envelope theory interventions", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 1 (1-2): 27-42, doi:10.1080/21641846.2012.733602 

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.