Muscle

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In ME and CFS[edit | edit source]

Several of the key symptoms observed by Melvin Ramsay and a part of his Ramsay definition involved muscle including muscle fatigability along with muscle pain and clumsiness (ataxia). Patients also complain of muscle fasciculations.

Numerous abnormalities have been found in the skeletal muscle of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis patients including:

Studies[edit | edit source]

  • 1991, Mitochondrial abnormalities in the postviral fatigue syndrome[2] - (Abstract)
  • 1995, Unusual pattern of mitochondrial DNA deletion in skeletal muscle of an adult human with chronic fatigue syndrome[3] - (Abstract)
  • 1996, Sensory characterization of somatic parietal tissues in humans with chronic fatigue syndrome[2] - (Abstract)
  • 2020, Altered muscle membrane potential and redox status differentiates two subgroups of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[9] - (Full text)
  • 2020, Skeletal Muscle Weakness Often Occurs in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome ME/CFS[10] - (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Behan, W. M. H.; More, I. A. R.; Behan, P. O. (Dec 1991). "Mitochondrial abnormalities in the postviral fatigue syndrome". Acta Neuropathologica. 83 (1): 61–65. doi:10.1007/bf00294431. ISSN 0001-6322. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.3 "Sensory characterization of somatic parietal tissues in humans with chronic fatigue syndrome". Neuroscience Letters. 208 (2): 117–120. Apr 19, 1996. doi:10.1016/0304-3940(96)12559-3. ISSN 0304-3940. 
  3. 3.03.1 Zhang, C.; Baumer, A.; Mackay, I. R.; Linnane, A. W.; Nagley, P. (Apr 1995). "Unusual pattern of mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle of an adult human with chronic fatigue syndrome". Human Molecular Genetics. 4 (4): 751–754. ISSN 0964-6906. PMID 7633428. 
  4. Albrecht, Robert (Mar 21, 1964). "Epidemic Neuromyasthenia Outbreak in a Convent in New York State". Journal of the American Medical Association. 187: 904–907. 
  5. Gow, J. W.; Behan, W. M. H.; Simpson, K.; McGarry, F.; Keir, S.; Behan, P. O. (Jan 1, 1994). "Studies on Enterovirus in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Clinical Infectious Diseases. 18 (Supplement_1): S126–S129. doi:10.1093/clinids/18.Supplement_1.S126. ISSN 1537-6591. 
  6. Cunningham, Louise; Bowles, N. E.; Lane, R. J. M.; Dubowitz, V.; Archard, L. C. (1990). "Persistence of enteroviral RNA in chronic fatigue syndrome is associated with the abnormal production of equal amounts of positive and negative strands of enteroviral RNA". Journal of General Virology. 71 (6): 1399–1402. doi:10.1099/0022-1317-71-6-1399. 
  7. Archard, L C; Bowles, N E; Behan, P O; Bell, E J; Doyle, D (Jun 1, 1988). "Postviral Fatigue Syndrome: Persistence of Enterovirus RNA in Muscle and Elevated Creatine Kinase, Postviral Fatigue Syndrome: Persistence of Enterovirus RNA in Muscle and Elevated Creatine Kinase". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 81 (6): 326–329. doi:10.1177/014107688808100608. ISSN 0141-0768. PMID 3404526. 
  8. Gow, J. W.; Behan, W. M.; Clements, G. B.; Woodall, C.; Riding, M.; Behan, P. O. (Mar 23, 1991). "Enteroviral RNA sequences detected by polymerase chain reaction in muscle of patients with postviral fatigue syndrome". BMJ. 302 (6778): 692–696. doi:10.1136/bmj.302.6778.692. ISSN 0959-8138. PMID 1850635. 
  9. Jammes, Yves; Adjriou, Nabil; Kipson, Nathalie; Criado, Christine; Charpin, Caroline; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Stavris, Chloé; Guieu, Régis; Fenouillet, Emmanuel (Dec 2020). "Altered muscle membrane potential and redox status differentiates two subgroups of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome" (PDF). Journal of Translational Medicine. 18 (1): 173. doi:10.1186/s12967-020-02341-9. ISSN 1479-5876. PMC 7168976Freely accessible. PMID 32306967. 
  10. Jammes, Y.; Retornaz, F. (2020). "Skeletal Muscle Weakness Often Occurs in Patients with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis / Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)". J Exp Neurol. 1 (2): 35–39. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

membrane - The word "membrane" can have different meanings in different fields of biology. In cell biology, a membrane is a layer of molecules that surround its contents. Examples of cell-biology membranes include the "cell membrane" that surrounds a cell, the "mitochondrial membranes" that form the outer layers of mitochondria, and the "viral envelope" that surrounds enveloped viruses. In anatomy or tissue biology, a membrane is a barrier formed by a layer of cells. Examples of anatomical membranes include the pleural membranes that surrounds the lungs, the pericardium which surrounds the heart, and some of the layers within the blood-brain barrier.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

BMJ - The BMJ (previously the British Medical Journal) is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.