Gut-brain axis

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The gut-brain axis is the bidirectional biochemical signaling that takes places between the gut and the brain, often involving intestinal microbiota. It is a framework that explains how dysbiosis might effect brain function in neurological disease and how attempt to alter micro biome composition might be therapeutic.

Most scientific knowledge about gut-brain interactions comes from the study of germ-free and single organism mice, that is mice that are raised with a completely sterile gastrointestinal tract or who are inoculated with a single bacterial species. Mice that develop without a microbiome have sensory processing impairments and impairments of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress response.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2017, Fecal metagenomic profiles in subgroups of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome[1] - (Full Text)

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Williams, Brent L.; Mishra, Nischay; Che, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bohyun; Bateman, Lucinda; Klimas, Nancy G.; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Levine, Susan; Montoya, Jose G.; Peterson, Daniel L.; Ramanan, Devi; Jain, Komal; Eddy, Meredith L.; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian (2017), "Fecal metagenomic profiles in subgroups of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome", Microbiome, 5 (44), doi:10.1186/s40168-017-0261-y

microbiome The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.