Diarrhea

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Diarrhea can occur as a symptom of ME/CFS. It forms part of a wider range of gastrointestinal disturbances in ME/CFS, and sometimes forms part of a diagnosis of IBS, a common comorbidity.

Prevalence[edit | edit source]

  • In 1995, Katrina Berne, PhD, reported a prevalence of 50-90% for IBS symptoms (including diarrhea, nausea, gas, and abdominal pain).[1]
  • In a 2001 Belgian study, 40.8% of patients meeting the Fukuda criteria and 45.6% of patients meeting the Holmes criteria, in a cohort of 2073 CFS patients, reported diarrhea.[2]

Symptom recognition[edit | edit source]

Gastrointestinal issues (diarrhoea, constipation, acid reflux) as a group are a potential symptom of Long COVID in the World Health Organization's definition.[3]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Possible causes[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Berne, Katrina (December 1, 1995). Running on Empty: The Complete Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFIDS) (2nd ed.). Hunter House. p. 58. ISBN 978-0897931915.
  2. De Becker, Pascale; McGregor, Neil; De Meirleir, Kenny (December 2001). "A definition‐based analysis of symptoms in a large cohort of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome". Journal of Internal Medicine. 250 (3): 234–240. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2796.2001.00890.x.
  3. Soriano, Joan B.; Allan, Maya; Alsokhn, Carine; Alwan, Nisreen A.; Askie, Lisa; Davis, Hannah E.; Diaz, Janet V.; Dua, Tarun; de Groote, Wouter; Jakob, Robert; Lado, Marta; Marshall, John; Murthy, Srin; Preller, Jacobus; Relan, Pryanka; Schiess, Nicoline; Seahwag, Archana (October 6, 2021), A clinical case definition of post COVID-19 condition by a Delphi consensus, World Health Organization (WHO) clinical case definition working group on post COVID-19 condition, World Health Organization

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.