Dauer

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Dauer is the German word for persistence or long-lived.[1][2]

Dauer larva[edit | edit source]

An alternative developmental stage known as dauer or dauer state has been found to in nematode worms, particularly Caenorhabditis elegans, whereby the larva goes into a type of stasis as a result of harsh environmental conditions.[3] The dauer worms stop feeding, and significantly reduce their movement, and have been reported to reversibly alter some of their sensory neurons.[3][4]

Used in relation to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[edit | edit source]

Dauer, or hibernation, was used to explain Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in the paper Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome; CFS was described as a "hypometabolic response to environmental stress similar to dauer".[1]

Letter: Reply to Vogt et at.[edit | edit source]

A letter by Vogt et at. (2016) challenged the conclusions drawn, stating that psychosocial or psychological causes could not be ruled and challenging the validity of the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome.[5] Naviaux et al. replied that "... chemical details of the metabolic findings in ME/CFS led directly to a survey of other hypometabolic syndromes like dauer, diapause, torpor, hibernation, and caloric restriction. It was the detailed nature and specific pattern of abnormalities affecting six pathways (sphingolipids, phospholipids, purines, cholesterol, polyamines, and redox metabolism), and not the over 50 other biochemical pathways interrogated, that focused our attention on dauer. In dauer, there is a reprioritization of sensory processing that is metabolically controlled (9). This situation bears similarities to ME/CFS."[6]

Letter: Reply to Roerink et al.[edit | edit source]

A letter from Roerink et al. raised questions and concerns about the lack of controls for exercise, diet and drug use, which they stated may have affected the results.[7] Naviaux and Gordon replied that the initial phase was done only with ambulatory CFS patients (i.e., able to walk/mobile), and clarified and corrected points raised about statistical methods used.[8]

Open Medicine Foundation[edit | edit source]

After the publication of the article, Dr Ron Davis invited Robert Naviaux to join the OMF Scientific Advisory Board.[9]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 Naviaux, Robert K.; Naviaux, Jane C.; Li, Kefeng; Bright, A. Taylor; Alaynick, William A.; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne (Aug 29, 2016). "Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 113 (37): E5472–E5480. doi:10.1073/pnas.1607571113. ISSN 0027-8424. PMC 5027464Freely accessible. PMID 27573827. Retrieved Feb 25, 2020. 
  2. "Dauer translation English | German dictionary | Reverso". dictionary.reverso.net. Retrieved Feb 25, 2020. 
  3. 3.03.1 Cassada, Randall C.; Russell, Richard L. (Oct 1, 1975). "The dauerlarva, a post-embryonic developmental variant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans". Developmental Biology. 46 (2): 326–342. doi:10.1016/0012-1606(75)90109-8. ISSN 0012-1606. 
  4. Klassen, Matthew P.; Yuan, Quan (Aug 19, 2013). "Dendrite Plasticity: Branching Out for Greener Pastures". Current Biology. 23 (16): R687–R688. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2013.07.036. ISSN 0960-9822. 
  5. Vogt, Henrik; Ulvestad, Elling; Wyller, Vegard Bruun (Nov 15, 2016). "Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome revisited". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 113 (46): E7140–E7141. doi:10.1073/pnas.1615143113. ISSN 0027-8424. PMID 27810961. 
  6. Naviaux, Robert K.; Naviaux, Jane C.; Li, Kefeng; Bright, A. Taylor; Alaynick, William A.; Wang, Lin; Baxter, Asha; Nathan, Neil; Anderson, Wayne (Nov 3, 2016). "Reply to Vogt et al.: Metabolomics and chronic fatigue syndrome". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 113 (46): E7142–E7143. doi:10.1073/pnas.1616261113. ISSN 0027-8424. 
  7. Roerink, Megan E.; Bronkhorst, Ewald M.; Meer, Jos W. M.; van deer Meer (Feb 7, 2017). "Metabolome of chronic fatigue syndrome". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 114 (6): E910–E910. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618447114. ISSN 0027-8424. PMID 28126718. 
  8. Naviaux, Robert K.; Gordon, Eric (Jan 26, 2017). "Reply to Roerink et al.: Metabolomics of chronic fatigue syndrome". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 114 (6): E911–E912. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618984114. ISSN 0027-8424. 
  9. National Academy of Sciences (May 2, 2017). "Correction for Naviaux et al., Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 114 (18): E3749–E3749. doi:10.1073/pnas.1703858114. ISSN 0027-8424. PMID 28439011. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.