Corticosteroid

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Corticosteroids are a group of drugs commonly referred to as steroids, though they are not to be confused with anabolic or other steroids.[1] These steroids are synthetic or naturally occurring versions of the hormones produced by the adrenal glands.[1][2]

Usage[edit | edit source]

Corticosteroids have many different uses, including autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, plus many other conditions like localized joint pain, COPD and asthma.[1][3]

Drugs[edit | edit source]

Corticosteroids drugs include hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone, glucocorticoid, betamethasone and dexamethasone.[2]

Glucocorticoids and mineralcorticoids[edit | edit source]

Corticosteroid drugs have different degrees of glucocorticoid or mineralcorticoid effects, or a mix of both.[2] Glucocorticoid effects generally involve "regulating metabolism, and inflammation." Mineralcorticoid effects generally involve "regulating sodium and water levels", and side effects may include increased excretion of potassium.[2] Fludrocortisone has strong mineralcorticoid effects, and may be used for orthostatic intolerance.

Glucocorticoid drugs, including prednisone, can have psychiatric side effects and cause bone problems, including glucocorticoid induced osteoporosis.[3]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 National Health Service. "Steroids"Free access subject to limited trial, subscription normally required. NICE. Retrieved May 2, 2019. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.3 Ericson-Neilsen, William; Kaye, Alan David (2014). "Steroids: Pharmacology, Complications, and Practice Delivery Issues". The Ochsner Journal. 14 (2): 203–207. ISSN 1524-5012. PMC 4052587Freely accessible. PMID 24940130. 
  3. 3.03.1 Yoshitomi, Hisae; Iwaoka, Emiko; Kubo, Masahide; Shibata, Masaru; Gao, Ming (Jan 2011). "Beneficial effect of Sparassis crispa on stroke through activation of Akt/eNOS pathway in brain of SHRSP". Journal of Natural Medicines. 65 (1): 135–141. doi:10.1007/s11418-010-0475-9. ISSN 1340-3443. PMC 2999729Freely accessible. PMID 21076883. 

NICE guidelines are clinical guidelines used in the UK.[1]


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history