Acid sensing ion channel 3

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Acid Sensing Ion Channel 3 or Acid Sensing Ion Channel Subunit 3 or ASIC3 receptors sense muscle metabolites.[1][2]

Exercise[edit | edit source]

White et al. (2012) found a trend towards both increasing ASIC3 and increasing transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in chronic fatigue syndrome patients 24hrs after moderate exercise, but both multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls had decreases in ASIC3, purinergic P2X 4 receptor (P2X4), and TRPV1 at 30 min post-exercise, and decreases in purinergic P2X 5 receptor (P2X5) 8hrs after exercise. Healthy controls also had significant decreases in P2X5 at 30 min post-exercise.

Function[edit | edit source]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2016, Gene expression factor analysis to differentiate pathways linked to fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and depression in a diverse patient sample[3] - (Full text)
  • 2012, Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[4](Full text)
  • 2012, Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression after moderate exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, patients with multiple sclerosis, and healthy controls[2](Full text)
  • 2012, Gene expression alterations at baseline and following moderate exercise in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome[5](Full Text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "ASIC3 - Acid Sensing Ion Channel Subunit 3 Gene card". Gene cards. Retrieved April 7, 2022.
  2. 2.02.1 White, AT; Light, AR; Hughen, RW; Vanhaitsma, TA; Light, KC (2012). "Differences in metabolite-detecting, adrenergic, and immune gene expression after moderate exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, patients with multiple sclerosis, and healthy controls". Psychosomatic Medicine. 74 (1): 46-54. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e31824152ed. PMC 3256093.
  3. Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R.; Donaldson, Gary W.; Okifuji, Akiko; Hughen, Ronald W.; White, Andrea T.; Light, Kathleen C. (January 2016). "Gene expression factor analysis to differentiate pathways linked to fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and depression in a diverse patient sample". Arthritis care & research. 68 (1): 132–140. doi:10.1002/acr.22639. ISSN 2151-464X. PMC 4684820. PMID 26097208.
  4. Light, KC; White, AT; Tadler, S; Iacob, E; Light, Alan R (2012). "Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome". Pain Research and Treatment: 427869. doi:10.1155/2012/427869. PMC 3200121.
  5. Light, Alan R; Bateman, Lucinda; Jo, Daehyun; Hughen, Ronald W; Vanhaitsma, Timothy A; White, AT; Light, Kathleen (2012). "Gene expression alterations at baseline and following moderate exercise in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome". Journal of Internal Medicine. 271 (1): 64-81. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02405.x. PMC 3175315.

metabolite A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.

metabolite A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.

somatic symptom disorder A psychiatric term to describe an alleged condition whereby a person's thoughts somehow cause physical symptoms. The actual existence of such a condition is highly controversial, due to a lack of scientific evidence. It is related to other psychiatric terms, such as "psychosomatic", "neurasthenia", and "hysteria". Older terms include "somatization", "somatoform disorder", and "conversion disorder". Such terms refer to a scientifically-unsupported theory that claims that a wide range of physical symptoms can be created by the human mind, a theory which has been criticized as "mind over matter" parapsychology, a pseudoscience.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.