Brains of People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Offer Clues About Disorder - New York Times: Well (2014)

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Top Scans: Control Patient, Bottom Scans: ME/CFS Patient - Source: New York Times WELL - fMRI Scan by Michael Zeineh with Jose Montoya and colleagues at Stanford ME/CFS Initiative

Brains of People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Offer Clues About Disorder - New York Times: Well (2014) is one of many ME/CFS articles by David Tuller.[1]

Brain imaging studies mentioned in article[edit | edit source]

  • 2014, The Stanford ME/CFS Initiative, directed by Dr. Jose Montoya and working with Dr. Michael Zeineh and colleagues, studied the brains of patients with CFS and healthy people and found distinct differences between the two groups. Radiology researchers have discovered that the brains of patients with CFS have diminished white matter and white matter abnormalities in the right hemisphere.[2][3][4]
  • 2014, A Japanese PET study looked at neuroinflammation in 9 patients with ME/CFS and 10 controls. They measured a protein expressed by activated microglia, and found that values in the cingulate cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, midbrain, and pons were 45%–199% higher in ME/CFS patients than in healthy controls. The values in the amygdala, thalamus, and midbrain positively correlated with cognitive impairment score, the values in the cingulate cortex and thalamus positively correlated with pain score, and the value in the hippocampus positively correlated with depression score.[5][4]

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history