Samantha Johnston

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Samantha C. Johnston, BSc, MIPH, MHEcon, PhD, is a Review Officer at New South Wales Ombudsman office in Sydney, Australia.[1] Prior she was an ME/CFS researcher for Griffith University, School of Medical Science, Gold Coast, Australia.[2]


Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2014, The role of clinical guidelines for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in research settings[4] - (Abstract)
  • 2014, The Role of Adaptive and Innate Immune Cells in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis[5] - (Full Text)
  • 2017, Dietary and nutrition interventions for the therapeutic treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a systematic review[6] - (Full Text)
  • 2017, Novel characterisation of mast cell phenotypes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients[7] - (Full Text)
  • 2018, Reduced glycolytic reserve in isolated natural killer cells from Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients: A preliminary investigation[8] - (Abstract)
  • 2020, Health-related quality of life in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: an Australian cross-sectional study[9] - (Full text)

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • PubMed
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Website
  • YouTube
  • Address: clinic/lab-address-goes-here

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. https://www.linkedin.com/in/samantha-johnston-719a44129/?originalSubdomain=au
  2. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Samantha_Johnston2
  3. Huth, Teilah K.; Brenu, Ekua; Nguyen, Thao; Hardcastle, Sharni L.; Johnston, Samantha; Ramos, Sandra; Staines, Donald R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya M. (2014), "Characterization of Natural Killer Cell Phenotypes in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis", Journal of Clinical & Cellular Immunology, 5 (3), doi:10.4172/2155-9899.1000223 
  4. Johnston, S.C.; Brenu, E.W.; Staines, D.R.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S.M. (Jan 2, 2014). "The role of clinical guidelines for chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis in research settings". Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior. 2 (1): 28–39. doi:10.1080/21641846.2013.860779. ISSN 2164-1846. 
  5. Brenu, EW; Huth, TK; Hardcastle, SL; Fuller, K; Kaur, M; Johnston, S; Ramos, S; Staines, D; Marshall-Gradisnik, S (2014), "The Role of adaptive and innate immune cells in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis",  International Immunology, 26 (4): 233-42, doi:10.1093/intimm/dxt068, PMID 24343819 
  6. Campagnolo, N.; Johnston, S.; Collatz, A.; Staines, D.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. (Jan 22, 2017). "Dietary and nutrition interventions for the therapeutic treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis: a systematic review". Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 30 (3): 247–259. doi:10.1111/jhn.12435. ISSN 0952-3871. PMID 28111818. 
  7. Nguyen, T.; Johnston, S.; Chacko, A.; Gibson, D.; Cepon, J.; Smith, D.; Staines, D.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. (2017), "Novel characterisation of mast cell phenotypes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis patients", Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol, 35 (2): 75-81, doi:10.12932/AP0771 
  8. Nguyen, T.; Staines, D.; Johnston, S.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. (Jul 2018), "Reduced glycolytic reserve in isolated natural killer cells from Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients: A preliminary investigation", Asian Pac J Allergy Immunol, doi:10.12932/AP-011117-0188 
  9. Eaton-Fitch, N.; Johnston, S. C.; Zalewski, P.; Staines, D.; Marshall-Gradisnik, S. (Jan 22, 2020). "Health-related quality of life in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: an Australian cross-sectional study". Quality of Life Research. doi:10.1007/s11136-019-02411-6. ISSN 0962-9343. 

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.