Pramipexole

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Pramipexole is a dopamine agonist used for Parkinson's disease and restless leg syndrome (RLS).[1][2][3] Pramipexole is also sold under the brand names Mirapex and Mirapex ER.[3]

Theory[edit | edit source]

Evidence[edit | edit source]

No clinicial trials have yet been carried out of pramipexole for patients with ME/CFS.

In 2005, Holman et al. found that pramipexole improved fatigue, pain, and overall function in fibromyalgia patients.[4]

Pramipexole has been shown to reduce fatigue in Parkinson's disease.[5]

Clinicians[edit | edit source]

Risks and safety[edit | edit source]

Costs and availability[edit | edit source]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2005, A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pramipexole, a dopamine agonist, in patients with fibromyalgia receiving concomitant medications[4] - (Full text)

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Pramipexole". MedlinePlus Drug Information. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  2. Singh, Raman; Parmar, Mayur (2022). Pramipexole. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing. PMID 32491471.
  3. 3.03.1 "Pramipexole Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - WebMD". WebMD. Retrieved February 21, 2022.
  4. 4.04.1 Holman, Andrew J.; Myers, Robin R. (2005). "A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pramipexole, a dopamine agonist, in patients with fibromyalgia receiving concomitant medications". Arthritis & Rheumatism. 52 (8): 2495–2505. doi:10.1002/art.21191. ISSN 1529-0131.
  5. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/internalmedicine/50/19/50_19_2163/_article/-char/ja/

agonist A chemical that binds to the receptor and stimulates it's function, e.g., morphine is an opioid agonist that binds to the opioid receptor, reducing pain. The opposite of an antagonist.

double blinded trial A clinical trial is double blinded if neither the participants nor the researchers know which treatment group they are allocated to until after the results are interpreted. This reduces bias. (Learn more: www.nottingham.ac.uk)

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.