Naproxen

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history
Jump to: navigation, search

Naproxen (brand names: Aleve, Naprosyn, and many others) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the propionic acid class (the same class as ibuprofen) that relieves pain, fever, swelling, and stiffness. It is a nonselective COX inhibitor, usually sold as the sodium salt. It is available in both an immediate release and extended release formulation. Naproxen is generally safe to use in breastfeeding mothers.

Side Effects[edit | edit source]

Using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory precautions is recommended to avoid gastrointestinal side effects. Hepatic and renal dysfunction may occur, and peripheral edema.[1] Central nervous system side effects include "dizziness, headaches, drowsiness and evidence of hypersensitives." [1]

More commonly reported ones are:

  • Gastrointestinal side-effects including bleeding.[1]

More commonly reported ones in children are:


Less commonly reported ones are:

Evidence[edit | edit source]

The Canadian Consensus Criteria suggests this drug for ME/CFS pain.[1]

Dose[edit | edit source]

A dose of 250mg is suggested, as needed, up to 3 times a day, according to by the Canadian Consensus Criteria.[1]


Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history