Influenza B

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The main flu (influenza) stains affecting humans are influenza type A strains and influenza type B strains. Both influenza A and B consist of a number of different strains that circulate across the world, with infections peaking each winter.[1]

Strains[edit | edit source]

Influenza type B strains are classified into two lineages:

  • Yamagata
  • Victoria

Each of these can be classified further into subtypes and variants.[1]

Pandemic flu[edit | edit source]

Influenza type B strains have not been known to cause pandemics; all pandemics traced have been influenza type A strains, including the Spanish flu (1918-1919), and the H1N1 swine flu (2009-2010) pandemics.[1][2]

Influenza vaccines[edit | edit source]

Annual influenza vaccines protect against both groups of inflenza B, and many subtypes of inflenza A virus.[3]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.11.2 "Types of Influenza Viruses". Centers for Disease Control. November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.
  2. Anhlan, Darisuren; Grundmann, Norbert; Makalowski, Wojciech; Ludwig, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph (January 2011). "Origin of the 1918 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus as studied by codon usage patterns and phylogenetic analysis". RNA. 17 (1): 64–73. doi:10.1261/rna.2395211. ISSN 1355-8382. PMC 3004067. PMID 21068184.
  3. "Key Facts About Seasonal Flu Vaccine". Centers for Disease Control. November 2, 2021. Retrieved November 11, 2021.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a U.S. government agency dedicated to epidemiology and public health. It operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Human Services.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.