GETSET trial

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The GETSET trial (short for Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) was a trial investigating the effectiveness of "guided graded exercise self-help" in patients with CFS/ME. The protocol was published in June 2016.[1] The results were published in June 2017.[2]

Researchers[edit | edit source]

Lead Author Lucy Clark, Peter White, Francesca Pesola, Janice M Thomas, Mario Vergara-Williamson and Michelle Beynon

Funding[edit | edit source]

The trial was funded in full by the National Institute for Health Research's Research for Patient Benefit programme.[3]

Protocol[edit | edit source]

The protocol of the trial was published in JMIR Research Protocols in June 2016.[1]

Publication[edit | edit source]

The results were published on 22 June 2017 in the Lancet: Guided graded exercise self-help plus specialist medical care versus specialist medical care alone for chronic fatigue syndrome (GETSET): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial[4]

Commentary was provided by Daniel Clauw in the Lancet: Guided graded exercise self-help as a treatment of fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome.[5]

The Science Media Centre provided: Expert reaction to study on guided self-help graded exercise therapy as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).[6]

It was reported in the Telegraph as Exercise can help chronic fatigue syndrome, study shows and other media outlets: Defeating chronic fatigue thanks to guided self-help approach to exercise.[7]

Criticism[edit | edit source]

Dr David Tuller has criticized the trial Trial by Error, Continued: More on Graded Exercise from Peter White and The Lancet.

Spoonseekerdotcom has criticised the GETSET trial.[8][9][10]

Professor Jonathan Edwards criticised the study for its "incompetent level of science".[11]

The ME Association has also criticised the trial ME Association Review: GETSET fails to demonstrate GET can significantly improve physical function.

Additional criticism has been published by other patients [12][13].

Documents[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 Clark, Lucy V.; McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D. (Jun 8, 2016), "Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study", JMIR research protocols, 5 (2): 70, doi:10.2196/resprot.5395, PMC 4917732Freely accessible, PMID 27278762 
  2. Clark, Lucy V.; Pesola, Francesca; Thomas, Janice; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Beynon, Michelle; White, Peter D. (Jun 22, 2017), "Guided graded exercise self-help plus specialist medical care versus specialist medical care alone for chronic fatigue syndrome (GETSET): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial", The Lancet, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32589-2 
  3. "ISRCTN - ISRCTN22975026: Graded Exercise Therapy guided SElf-help Treatment for CFS/ME". www.isrctn.com. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  4. Clark, Lucy V.; Pesola, Francesca; Thomas, Janice M.; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Beynon, Michelle; White, Peter D. (Jul 22, 2017). "Guided graded exercise self-help plus specialist medical care versus specialist medical care alone for chronic fatigue syndrome (GETSET): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial". The Lancet. 390 (10092): 363–373. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32589-2. ISSN 0140-6736. PMID 28648402. 
  5. Clauw, Daniel J (Jul 2017). "Guided graded exercise self-help as a treatment of fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome". The Lancet. 390 (10092): 335–336. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30577-9. 
  6. "expert reaction to study on guided self-help graded exercise therapy as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) | Science Media Centre". Retrieved May 8, 2020. 
  7. "Defeating chronic fatigue thanks to guided self-help approach to exercise". Emergency Live. Retrieved May 8, 2020. 
  8. Spoonseeker, Author (May 23, 2016). "A Few Notes on GETSET". spoonseekerdotcom. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  9. Spoonseeker, Author (Jun 29, 2017). "Do GET Yourself". spoonseekerdotcom. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  10. Spoonseeker, Author (Jul 3, 2017). "Spotlight on GETSET Julie". spoonseekerdotcom. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  11. "Trial by Error, Continued: More on Graded Exercise from Peter White and The Lancet". Phoenix Rising ME / CFS Forums. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  12. Corsius, Lou (Jun 23, 2017). "Yet another publication with misleading conclusions from PACE-land". it's about ME (in Nederlands). Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 
  13. Johnson, Cort (Jun 26, 2017). "On Your Marks GETSET: Don't Go - Major Graded Exercise ME/CFS Trial Underwhelms (Again)". Health Rising. Retrieved Jan 26, 2020. 

graded exercise therapy (GET) - A gradual increase in exercise or activity, according to a pre-defined plan. Focuses on overcoming the patient's alleged unhelpful illness beliefs that exertion can exacerbate symptoms, rather than on reversing physical deconditioning. Considered controversial, and possibly harmful, in the treatment or management of ME. One of the treatment arms of the controversial PACE trial.

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

randomized controlled trial (RCT) - A trial in which participants are randomly assigned to two groups, with one group receiving the treatment being studied and a control or comparison group receiving a sham treatment, placebo, or comparison treatment.

randomized controlled trial (RCT) - A trial in which participants are randomly assigned to two groups, with one group receiving the treatment being studied and a control or comparison group receiving a sham treatment, placebo, or comparison treatment.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.