Endometriosis

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Endometriosis is a condition in which the layer of tissue that normally covers the inside of the uterus (the endometrium) grows outside of it. One third of women with endometriosis have no symptoms.

Symptoms[edit | edit source]

Symptoms may include[1]:

  • Dysmenorrhea
  • Heavy or irregular bleeding
  • Pelvic pain
  • Lower abdominal or back pain 
  • Dyspareunia
  • Dyschezia (pain on defecation) - Often with cycles of diarrhea and constipation
  • Bloating, nausea, and vomiting
  • Inguinal pain
  • Pain on micturition and/or urinary frequency
  • Pain during exercise

Diagnosis[edit | edit source]

Treatment & Management[edit | edit source]

Co-morbdities[edit | edit source]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

Patients with ME/CFS may have higher rates of gynecologic disorders including endometriosis, ovarian cysts, polycystic ovaries, uterine fibroids, menstrual abnormalities and galactorrhea.[2]

A 2018 study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that more than a third of women with CFS (36.1%) reported endometriosis as a comorbid condition. Women with both CFS and endometriosis report more chronic pelvic pain, earlier menopause, hysterectomy, and more CFS-related symptoms compared to women with CFS-only.[3]

Research studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2019, Endometriosis as a Comorbid Condition in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Secondary Analysis of Data from a CFS Case-Control study[3]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Davila, G. Willy (Dec 5, 2017). "Endometriosis". Medscape. 
  2. Harlow, BL (Sep 28, 1998). "Reproductive correlates of chronic fatigue syndrome". American Journal of Medicine. 
  3. 3.03.1 Boneva, Roumiana S.; Lin, Jin-Mann S.; Wieser, Friedrich; Nater, Urs M.; Ditzen, Beate; Taylor, Robert N.; Unger, Elizabeth R. (Apr 2018). "Endometriosis as a Comorbid Condition in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Secondary Analysis of Data from a CFS Case-Control study". Frontiers in Pediatrics. doi:10.3389/fped.2019.00195. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome, often used when both illnesses are considered the same.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.