CDC Multi-site Clinical Assessment of CFS

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The CDC Multi-site Clinical Assessment of CFS is a research study that began in 2012, led by Dr. Elizabeth Unger at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). It aims to recruit 450 patients aged 18-70 years old from seven clinical sites in the United States with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), post-infective fatigue or myalgic encephalomyelitis(ME).[1]

Selection criteria[edit | edit source]

The study's criteria are described as:

Any patient (aged 18 – 70 years) that is managed or diagnosed with CFS, post-infective fatigue (PIF) or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) at any of the seven participating clinical sites is eligible for participation in this study. Clinicians from each participating clinical site will determine whether a patient has CFS based on their clinical experience and expertise in CFS.[2]

Compliance with a specific case definition, such as Fukuda criteria or Canadian Consensus Criteria is not necessary. The participating physician may use his or her best judgement as to whether a patient meets the diagnosis. In doing so, the study hopes to be able to identify a consensus about a case definition based on biologic measures, as well as sub-sets of the illness which can individualized treatments.[3]

Participating clinical sites[edit | edit source]

Preliminary data[edit | edit source]

At the CDC Grand Rounds event in February 2016 Doctor Elizabeth Unger showed the following slide summarizing the function of the study's patient group. The red markers show normal values for healthy people. The blue boxes represent the range for study participants, with the diamonds showing the study participants' average score. The chart demonstrates near-normal mental health and emotional role functioning, but very poor physical function.[4][5]

2016 CDC multi-center study slide.jpg

Notable people[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 "Multi-site Clinical Assessment of CFS | Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) | CDC". www.cdc.gov. Jul 14, 2017. Retrieved Sep 7, 2018. 
  2. "Multi-site Clinical Assessment of CFS | Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) | CDC". www.cdc.gov. Jul 14, 2017. What case definition was used for determining CFS cases?. Retrieved Sep 7, 2018. 
  3. "CDC Multi-site Study – An interview with Beth Unger". Phoenix Rising. Jan 31, 2014. Retrieved Sep 7, 2018. 
  4. "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Advancing Research and Clinical Education". YouTube. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feb 19, 2016. 
  5. Unger, Elizabeth (2016). "CDC PUBLIC HEALTH GRAND ROUNDS Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Advancing Research and Clinical Education" (PDF). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.