Brian Hughes

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Brian Michael Hughes, Ph.D., is a specialist in stress psychophysiology and a Professor of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.[1]

Education[edit | edit source]

  • 1993, B.A. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[2]
  • 1998, Ph.D. degree in Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway[2]
  • 2009, Ed.M. degree in Science Education, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, US[2]

Books[edit | edit source]

  • 2018, Psychology in Crisis[3]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

  • October 2018, Invited lecture, Hope 4 ME & Fibro NI, Newry, Northern Ireland; Speech title: The PACE Trial and Psychology’s Crisis[2]
  • September 2019, Keynote Lecture, Hope 4 ME & Fibro NI Annual Conference, Belfast, Northern Ireland; Speech title: Off the PACE and not NICE: Challenges facing evidence-based practice in ME/CFS[2]

Articles[edit | edit source]

  • 2019, Monitoring treatment harm in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: A freedom-of-information study of National Health Service specialist centres in England[4] - (Abstract)

Online presence[edit | edit source]

  • Facebook
  • YouTube

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Psychology - NUI Galway". www.nuigalway.ie. Retrieved Aug 7, 2019. 
  2. 2.02.12.22.32.4 "Brian M. Hughes CV" (PDF). Retrieved Aug 7, 2019. 
  3. Hughes, Brian M. (2018). Psychology in crisis. London. ISBN 1352003007. OCLC 1027144538. 
  4. McPhee, Graham; Baldwin, Adrian; Kindlon, Tom; Hughes, Brian M (Jun 24, 2019). "Monitoring treatment harm in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: A freedom-of-information study of National Health Service specialist centres in England". Journal of Health Psychology: 135910531985453. doi:10.1177/1359105319854532. ISSN 1359-1053. 

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.