Bell CFIDS disability scale

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The Bell CFIDS disability scale aka Bell disability scale aka Bell fatigue scale is a symptom scale created by Dr. David Bell, the New York state physician at the heart of the 1985 Lyndonville outbreak and described in his 1995 book, The Doctor’s Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Understanding, Treating and Living with CFIDS.[1]

Features[edit | edit source]

  • Self-scoring
  • For adults with ME/CFS
  • Comprised of eleven statements
  • Scale is scored from 0 (very severe, bedridden constantly) – 100 (healthy)
  • No fee for use

CFIDS Disability Scale[edit | edit source]

Directions: Please circle the number of the statement that best describes your level of physical function.[2]

100: No symptoms at rest; no symptoms with exercise; normal overall activity level; able to work full-time without difficulty.

90: No symptoms at rest; mild symptoms with activity; normal overall activity level; able to work full-time without difficulty.

80: Mild symptoms at rest; symptoms worsened by exertion; minimal activity restriction noted for activities requiring exertion only; able to work full-time with difficulty in jobs requiring exertion.

70: Mild symptoms at rest; some daily activity limitation clearly noted. Overall functioning close to 90% of expected except for activities requiring exertion. Able to work full-time with difficulty.

60: Mild to moderate symptoms at rest; daily activity limitation clearly noted. Overall functioning 70%-90%. Unable to work full-time in jobs requiring physical labor, but able to work full-time in light activity if hours flexible.

50: Moderate symptoms at rest. Moderate to severe symptoms with exercise or activity; overall activity level reduced to 70% of expected. Unable to perform strenuous duties, but able to perform light duty or desk work 4-5 hours a day, but requires rest periods.

40: Moderate symptoms at rest. Moderate to severe symptoms with exercise or activity; overall activity level reduced to 50%-70% of expected. Not confined to house. Unable to perform strenuous duties; able to perform light duty or desk work 3-4 hours a day, but requires rest periods.

30: Moderate to severe symptoms at rest. Severe symptoms with any exercise; overall activity level reduced to 50% of expected. Usually confined to house. Unable to perform any strenuous tasks. Able to perform desk work 2-3 hours a day, but requires rest periods.

20: Moderate to severe symptoms at rest. Unable to perform strenuous activity; overall activity 30%-50% of expected. Unable to leave house except rarely; confined to bed most of day; unable to concentrate for more than 1 hour a day.

10: Severe symptoms at rest; bedridden the majority of the time. No travel outside of the house. Marked cognitive symptoms preventing concentration.

0: Severe symptoms on a continuous basis; bedridden constantly; unable to care for self.

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Bell DS. The Doctor’s Guide to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Understanding, Treating and Living with CFIDS. Boston: Da Capo Lifelong Books; 1995.
  2. http://www.oiresource.com/cfsscale.htm

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A controversial term, invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, that generally refers to a collection of symptoms as “fatigue”. There have been multiple attempts to come up with a set of diagnostic criteria to define this term, but few of those diagnostic criteria are currently in use. Previous attempts to define this term include the Fukuda criteria and the Oxford criteria. Some view the term as a useful diagnostic category for people with long-term fatigue of unexplained origin. Others view the term as a derogatory term borne out of animus towards patients. Some view the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, while others view myalgic encephalomyelitis as a distinct disease.

Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS) - Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome is another term for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, but one which emphasizes the immunological aspects of the disease. Popular in the 1990's, this term has apparently fallen into disuse.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.