Acetyl coenzyme A

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Acetyl coenzyme A or acetyl-CoA is a key metabolite that plays a significant role in a number of processes in the body including energy metabolism, mitosis, autophagy and regulated cell death.[1]

Function[edit | edit source]

Acetyl coenzyme A is the molecule through which glycolytic pyruvate enters the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle), and is a key precursor to lipud metabolism.[1]

Coenzyme A[edit | edit source]

ME/CFS[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.01.1 Pietrocola, Federico; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido (June 2, 2015). "Acetyl coenzyme A: a central metabolite and second messenger". Cell Metabolism. 21 (6): 805–821. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2015.05.014. ISSN 1932-7420. PMID 26039447.

metabolite A chemical compound produced by, or involved in, metabolism. The term is often used to refer to the degradation products of drugs in the body.

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.