Karl Morten

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Source:obs-gyn.ox.ac.uk

Karl J. Morten, PhD, is a senior researcher and laboratory manager at the Nuffield Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University, United Kingdom.[1] His work focuses on understanding the role of mitochondria in health and disease. Some of his work has been funded by The ME Association.[2]

Projects funded by ME Association[edit | edit source]

Mitochondrial function in Neutrophils and Monocytes[edit | edit source]

In March 2016 The ME Association announced it would fund Dr Morten and Professor Joanna Poulton to to assess mitochondrial function in Neutrophil and Monocyte cells from ME/CFS patients.[3]

"The pilot study will set up the tests required to assess mitochondrial function in blood samples from ME/CFS patients. This will make the blood tests more globally accessible to a wide range of researchers allowing a more universal validation of the findings of Booth/Myhill."[4]

ME Association Christmas Appeal 2016[edit | edit source]

The ME Association Christmas Appeal for 2016 sought to raise £50,000 to fund research by a team led by Dr Morten to study metabolomics in patients.[5] Dr Morten will work alongside scientists from Oxford and Newcastle Universities including Prof Julia Newton. Part of the team is ME/CFS patient Jamie Strong. [6]

The research will focus on the chemical clues left behind by mitochondrial cells and follow on from the work of Dr Robert Naviaux in this area.[7] 300 blood samples will analysed, many from the UK ME/CFS biobank.

Mitochondrial Energy Score test validation study[edit | edit source]

In 2019, Karl Morten and colleagues published their attempt to replicate the Mitochondrial Energy Score test provided by Dr Sarah Myhill, Norman Booth and John McLaren-Howard using samples from 10 patients who met the Canadian Consensus Criteria fire ME/CFS, and 13 healthy controls.[8] They were unable to confirm the mitochondrial findings. Myhill responded to the publication, outlining significant factors that may have affected the results including the freezing of samples, and criticized the publication for incorrectly stating that the Mitochondrial Energy Score had been described as a diagnostic test for CFS/ME.[9]

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

Talks and interviews[edit | edit source]

Online presence[edit | edit source]

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Karl Morten — Nuffield Department of Women's & Reproductive Health". www.wrh.ox.ac.uk. Retrieved Sep 27, 2020. 
  2. "ME Association: contributions towards mitochondrial muscle research". The ME Association. May 17, 2016. 
  3. "ME Association to fund fourth study into the role of the mitochondria in ME/CFS | 10 March 2016". Retrieved Aug 16, 2019. 
  4. Myhill, Sarah; Booth, Norman E.; McLaren-Howard, John (Jan 15, 2009). "Chronic fatigue syndrome and mitochondrial dysfunction". International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. 2 (1): 1–16. ISSN 1940-5901. PMC 2680051Freely accessible. PMID 19436827. 
  5. MEA Xmas Appeal Announcment November 2016
  6. Make ME Better! | Why our Christmas Appeal has got personal for Jamie | 23 November 2016
  7. Metabolic features of chronic fatigue syndrome: R Naviaux et al
  8. 8.08.1 Morten, Karl J.; Newton, Julia L.; Joanna L. Elson; Potter, Michelle; Lodge, Tiffany A.; Tomas, Cara (Aug 7, 2019). "Assessing cellular energy dysfunction in CFS/ME using a commercially available laboratory test". Scientific Reports. 9 (1): 1–9. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47966-z. ISSN 2045-2322. 
  9. Myhill, Sarah (Aug 2019). "Response to the paper 'Assessing cellular energy dysfunction in CFS/ME using a commercially available laboratory test' by Cara Tomas et al". www.drmyhill.co.uk. Retrieved Aug 16, 2019. 
  10. Xu, Jiabao; Potter, Michelle; Tomas, Cara; Elson, Jo; Morten, Karl; Poulton, Joanna; Wang, Ning; Jin, Hanqing; Hou, Zhaoxu (2018). "A new approach to find biomarkers in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) by single-cell Raman micro-spectroscopy". The Analyst. doi:10.1039/C8AN01437J. ISSN 0003-2654. 
  11. Morten, Karl J.; Staines-Urias, Eleonora; Kenyon, Julian (Dec 2018). "Potential clinical usefulness of gut microbiome testing in a variety of clinical conditions". Human Microbiome Journal. 10: 6–10. doi:10.1016/j.humic.2018.08.003. ISSN 2452-2317. 

Oxford University - a prestigious university located in Oxford, England renowned for its teaching and research in health and medicine

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

mitochondria - Important parts of the biological cell, with each mitochondrion encased within a mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are best known for their role in energy production, earning them the nickname "the powerhouse of the cell". Mitochondria also participate in the detection of threats and the response to these threats. One of the responses to threats orchestrated by mitochondria is apoptosis, a cell suicide program used by cells when the threat can not be eliminated.

Canadian Consensus Criteria (CCC) - A set of diagnostic criteria used to diagnose ME/CFS, developed by a group of practicing ME/CFS clinicians in 2003. The CCC is often considered to be the most complex criteria, but possibly the most accurate, with the lowest number of patients meeting the criteria. Led to the development of the International Consensus Criteria (ICC) in 2011.

ME/CFS - An acronym that combines myalgic encephalomyelitis with chronic fatigue syndrome. Sometimes they are combined because people have trouble distinguishing one from the other. Sometimes they are combined because people see them as synonyms of each other.

microbiome - The full collection of microscopic organisms (especially bacteria and fungi) which are present in a particular environment, particularly inside the human body.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
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