Julia Newton

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Julia L. Newton is a Clinical Professor of Ageing and Medicine at the University of Newcastle in the United Kingdom. She has published a number of ME/CFS studies focusing on autonomic nervous system[1] dysfunction and the role of inflammation in fatigue. She is a member of the UK CFS/ME Collaborative and is the Joint Medical Adviser of the charity Action for ME.

She is Director of the Newcastle Fatigue Research Group [2] and Associate Medical Director for Research for Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Notable studies[edit]

  • 2017, Clinical criteria versus a possible research case definition in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis[3]
  • 2017, Two year follow-up of sleep diaries and polysomnography in chronic fatigue syndrome: a cohort study, Abstract[4]
  • 2016, Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome[5]
  • 2016, Treatment of insomnia reduces fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome in those able to comply with the intervention, Abstract[6]
  • 2016, Housebound versus nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome
    "Abstract - Objectives: The objective of this study was to examine individuals with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome who are confined to their homes due to severe symptomatology. The existing literature fails to address differences between this group, and less severe, nonhousebound patient populations. Methods: Participants completed the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire, a measure of myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome symptomology, and the SF-36, a measure of health impact on physical/mental functioning. ANOVAs and, where appropriate, MANCOVAS were used to compare housebound and nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome across areas of functioning, symptomatology, and illness onset characteristics. Results: Findings indicated that the housebound group represented one quarter of the sample, and were significantly more impaired with regards to physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning, fatigue, postexertional malaise, sleep, pain, neurocognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and immune functioning compared to individuals who were not housebound. Discussion: Findings indicated that housebound patients have more impairment on functional and symptom outcomes compared to those who were not housebound. Understanding the differences between housebound and not housebound groups holds implications for physicians and researchers as they develop interventions intended for patients who are most severely affected by this chronic illness."[7]
  • 2016, Assessing current functioning as a measure of significant reduction in activity level
    "Abstract - Background: Myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome have case definitions with varying criteria, but almost all criteria require an individual to have a substantial reduction in activity level. Unfortunately, a consensus has not been reached regarding what constitutes substantial reductions. One measure that has been used to measure substantial reduction is the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Purpose: The current study examined the relationship between the SF-36, a measure of current functioning, and a self-report measure of the percent reduction in hours spent on activities. Results: Findings indicated that select subscales of the SF-36 accurately measure significant reductions in functioning. Further, this measure significantly differentiates patients from controls. Conclusion: Determining what constitutes a significant reduction in activity is difficult because it is subjective to the individual. However, certain subscales of the SF-36 could provide a uniform way to accurately measure and define substantial reductions in functioning.[8]
  • 2016, The Relationship between Age and Illness Duration in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    "Abstract:Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a debilitating illness, but it is unclear if patient age and illness duration might affect symptoms and functioning of patients. In the current study, participants were categorized into four groups based upon age (under or over age 55) and illness duration (more or less than 10 years). The groups were compared on functioning and symptoms. Findings indicated that those who were older with a longer illness duration had significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than those who were younger with a shorter or longer illness duration and the older group with a shorter illness duration. The results suggest that older patients with an illness duration of over 10 years have significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than the three other groups. For symptoms, the younger/longer illness duration group had significantly worse immune and autonomic domains than the older/longer illness group. In addition, the younger patients with a longer illness duration displayed greater autonomic and immune symptoms in comparison to the older group with a longer illness duration. These findings suggest that both age and illness duration need to be considered when trying to understand the influence of these factors on patients.[9]
  • 2016, Reduced cardiac volumes in chronic fatigue syndrome associate with plasma volume but not length of disease: a cohort study[10]
  • 2016, The aetiopathogenesis of fatigue: unpredictable, complex and persistent[11]
  • 2016, A comparative polysomnography analysis of sleep in healthy controls and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome[12]
  • 2016, Case definitions integrating empiric and consensus perspectives[13]
  • 2016, Are Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome different illnesses? A preliminary analysis (FULL TEXT)
    Abstract - Considerable discussion has transpired regarding whether chronic fatigue syndrome is a distinct illness from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. A prior study contrasted the Myalgic Encephalomyelitis International Consensus Criteria (ME-ICC; Carruthers et al., 2011) with the Fukuda et al. (1994) CFS criteria and found that the ME-ICC identified a subset of patients with greater functional impairment and physical, mental, and cognitive problems than the larger group who met Fukuda et al. (1994) criteria (Brown et al., 2013). The current study analyzed two discrete data sets and found that the ME-ICC identified more impaired individuals with more severe symptomatology.[14]
  • 2015, Rethinking childhood adversity in chronic fatigue syndrome
  • 2015, Autonomic function in chronic fatigue syndrome with and without painful temporomandibular disorder[15]
  • 2015, Chronic fatigue syndrome versus systemic exertion intolerance disease[16]
  • 2015, Factor Analysis of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire: Identifying Core Domains (FULL TEXT)[17]
  • 2015, Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0122982 (FULL TEXT)][18]
  • 2015, Comparing and contrasting consensus versus empirical domains. Abstract[19]
  • 2014, The role of sleep in chronic fatigue syndrome: a narrative review. Abstract[20]
  • 2013, Contrasting chronic fatigue syndrome versus myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Abstract[21]
  • 2012, Impaired cardiac function in chronic fatigue syndrome measured using magnetic resonance cardiac tagging (FULL TEXT)[22]
  • 2011, Loss of capacity to recover from acidosis on repeat exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome: a case–control study[23]

Talks & interviews[edit]

Talks for Dutch ME/CFS Society

2014, Playlist on YouTube containing:

Invest in ME International ME Conferences

  • 2014, Speaker at the 9th Invest in ME International ME Conference [24] DVD available
  • 2008, Speaker at the 3rd Invest in ME International ME Conference on Autonomic Dysfunction: Identification of aetiologically distinct subject groups within ME/CFS[25] DVD available

Learn more[edit]

Online presence[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Newcatle University Profile: Julia Newton
  2. Newcastle Fatigue Research Group
  3. Jason, LA; McManimen, Stephanie; Sunnquist, M; Newton, JL; Strand, EB (2017), "Clinical criteria versus a possible research case definition in chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis", Fatigue: biomedicine, health & behavior, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1299077 
  4. Davidson, Sean L.; Gotts, Zoe M.; Ellis, Jason G.; Newton, Julia L. (Mar 2017), "Two year follow-up of sleep diaries and polysomnography in chronic fatigue syndrome: a cohort study", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, doi:10.1080/21641846.2017.1297280 
  5. Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L. (2016), "Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Journal of Aging Research, doi:10.1155/2016/2497348 
  6. Gotts, Zoe; Deary, Vincent; Newton, Julia; Ellis, Jason (2016), "Treatment of insomnia reduces fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome in those able to comply with the intervention", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (4): 208-216, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1222699 
  7. Pendergrast, Tricia; Brown, Abigail; Sunnquist, Madison; Jantke, Rachel L.; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle; Jason, Leonard A (2016), "Housebound versus nonhousebound patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome", Chronic Illness, doi:10.1177/1742395316644770 
  8. Thorpe, Taylor; McManimena, Stephanie; Gleasona, Kristen; Stoothoff, Jamie; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle; Jason, Leonard A. (2016), "Assessing current functioning as a measure of significant reduction in activity level", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (3): 175-188, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1206176 
  9. Kidd, Elizabeth; Brown, Abigail; McManimen, Stephanie; Jason, Leonard A.; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin B. (2016), "The Relationship between Age and Illness Duration in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", Diagnostics, 6 (2): 16, doi:10.3390/diagnostics6020016 
  10. Newton, Julia L.; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Petrides, George; Frith, James; Hodgson, Tim; Maclachlan, Laura; MacGowan, Guy; Blamire, Andrew M. (2016), "Reduced cardiac volumes in chronic fatigue syndrome associate with plasma volume but not length of disease: a cohort study", Open Heart, 3 (1), doi:10.1136/openhrt-2015-000381 
  11. Clark, James E.; Ng, W. Fai; Watson, Stuart; Newton, Julia L. (2016), "The aetiopathogenesis of fatigue: unpredictable, complex and persistent", British Medical Bulletin, 2016 (117): 139–148, doi:10.1093/bmb/ldv057 
  12. Gotts, Z.M.; Dearya, V.; Newton, Julia L.; Ellis, J. G. (2016), "A comparative polysomnography analysis of sleep in healthy controls and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 4 (2): 80-93, doi:10.1080/21641846.2016.1167470 
  13. Jason, L. A., McManimen, S., Sunnquist, M., Brown, A., Furst, J., Newton, J. L., & Strand, E. B. (2016). Case definitions integrating empiric and consensus perspectives. Fatigue: biomedicine, health & behavior, 4 (1), 1-23. doi:10.1080/21641846.2015.1124520
  14. Leonard A Jason, Madison Sunnquist, Abigail Brown, Meredyth Evans, and Julia L Newton. (2016). Are Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and chronic fatigue syndrome different illnesses? A preliminary analysis. Journal of Health Psychology, 21(1), 3–15. http://doi.org/10.1177/1359105313520335
  15. Robinson, L. J., Durham, J., MacLachlan, L. L., & Newton, J. L. (2015). Autonomic function in chronic fatigue syndrome with and without painful temporomandibular disorder. Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 3(4), 205-219.
  16. Jason, L.A.; Sunnquist, M.; Brown, A.; Newton, J.L.; Strand, E.B.; Vernon, S.D. (2015), "Chronic fatigue syndrome versus systemic exertion intolerance disease", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 3 (3): 127-141, doi:10.1080/21641846.2015.1051291 
  17. Leonard A. Jason, Madison Sunnquist, Abigail Brown, Jacob Furst, Marjoe Cid, Jillianna Farietta, Bobby Kot, Craig Bloomer, Laura Nicholson, Yolonda Williams, Rachel Jantke, Julia L. Newton, and Elin Bolle Strand (2015). Factor Analysis of the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire: Identifying Core Domains. Journal of Neurology and Neurobiology, 1(4), 10.16966/2379–7150.114.
  18. Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L. (2015), "Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome", PLoS One, 10 (4), doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122982 
  19. Jason, LA; Kot, B; Sunnquist, M; Brown, A; Reed, J; Furst, J; Newton, JL; Strand, EB; Vernon, SD (2015), "Comparing and Contrasting Consensus versus Empirical Domains", Fatigue: biomedicine, health & behavior, 3 (2): 63-74, PMID 26977374, doi:10.1080/21641846.2015.1017344 
  20. Gotts, Z. M., Ellis, J. G., Newton, J. L., & Deary, V. (2014). The role of sleep in chronic fatigue syndrome: a narrative review. Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 2(3), 163-184. doi:10.1080/21641846.2014.935607
  21. Jason, LA; Brown, A; Evans, M; Sunnquist, M; Newton, JL (2013), "Contrasting chronic fatigue syndrome versus myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome", Fatigue: Biomedicine, Health & Behavior, 1 (3): 168-183, doi:10.1080/21641846.2013.774556 
  22. Hollingsworth, KG; Hodgson, T; MacGowan, GA; Blamire, AM; Newton, JL (2012), "Impaired cardiac function in chronic fatigue syndrome measured using magnetic resonance cardiac tagging", Journal of Internal Medicine, 271: 264–270, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2796.2011.02429.x 
  23. Jones, David E. J.; Hollingsworth, Kieren G.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.; Fattakhova, Gulnar; Pairman, Jessie; Blamire, Andrew M.; Trenell, Michael I.; Newton, Julia L. (2011), "Loss of capacity to recover from acidosis on repeat exercise in chronic fatigue syndrome: a case–control study,", European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 42 (2), doi:10.1111/j.1365-2362.2011.02567.x 
  24. http://www.investinme.eu/IIMEC9.shtml#agenda
  25. http://www.investinme.eu/IIMEC3.shtml#agenda


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history