Neutrophil

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Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cells in humans, accounting for 40-65% of white blood cells. Their number increase up to ten times during infection. They are formed from stem cells made in blood marrow and are part of the innate immune system.[1]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Edwards, Steven W. (1994). Biochemistry and physiology of the neutrophil. Cambridge University Press. p. 6. ISBN 0-521-41698-1.

physiological Concerning living organisms, such as cells or the human body.  Physio logical (as in physio) is not to be confused with psych ological (emotional stress).

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From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.