Blood

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A number of blood abnormalities have been detected in patients who present with ME/CFS, it is hypothesised that these may result in a number of symptoms that are experienced by patients, though taking steps to address various of these abnormalities has resulted in symptomatic relief for a number of patients, a reliable 'cure' has yet to result from blood work.

Abnormalities[edit]

A high proportion of ME/CFS patients have been shown via a Dual Tag Test to have significantly lower blood volume than healthy controls. [1][2] Dr. Nancy Klimas who was a member of the team who showed this has since been quoted as saying by way of a Layman's explanation: “You guys are about a litre short in blood volume, ok? If I’m sitting at five litres, you’re sitting at four. So, you’re really, really sensitive to blood volume changes. If you’re a little dry, you crash. ” [3]

One study found significantly increased quantities of stomatocytes in the blood of CFS patients. Stomatocytes are red blood cells that have lost their concave shape, usually due to a membrane defect. [4]

During the early stages of the illness a number of circulating immune markers in the blood have been noted. [5]

Symptoms Resulting from Abnormalities[edit]

The various forms of Orthostatic intolerance that a number of ME/CFS patients suffer have been linked to under-oxygenation of the brain [6] due to a combination of red blood cell abnormalities and low blood volume. It has also been suggested that blood pressure and other circulatory system abnormalities contribute to this under-oxygenation. [7] However others state that this may be a direct result of the Adrenal system instead.

Proposed Causes for Blood Abnormalities[edit]

Abnormality Treatments and Adjustments[edit]

Learn more[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

<references>
  1. http://www.clinsci.org/content/118/2/125
  2. Circulating Blood Volume in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  3. Citation Needed
  4. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0188440906002992
  5. http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/advances/1/1/e1400121.full.pdf
  6. Citation Needed
  7. Citation Needed


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history