Red blood cell

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Red blood cells (RBCs), also called erythrocytes, are the most common type of blood cell in the human body.

In M.E.[edit | edit source]

Red blood cell abnormalities have been found in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War Illness.

A small study of veterans with Gulf War Illness found increased deformability (the ability of erythrocytes to change shape under a given level of applied stress without rupturing) along with increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and red blood cell distribution width (RDW).[1]

A 1989 study found higher numbers of cup-form red blood cells in M.E. patients versus controls.[2]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Falvo, MJ (2018). "Abnormal rheological properties of red blood cells as a potential marker of Gulf War Illness: A preliminary study". Clin Hemorheol Microcirc. 
  2. Simpson, LO (1989), "Nondiscocytic erythrocytes in myalgic encephalomyelitis", The New Zealand Medical Journal, 102 (864): 126-127, PMID 2927808 


The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.

From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history