York Review

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The diagnosis, treatment and management of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) / myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) in adults and children: Work to support the NICE Guidelines, colloquially known as the York Review, is a 2005 report from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) based at the University of York in England, UK[1]

Aim[edit | edit source]

The York Review was a Draft Consultation document that was intended to provide an evidence-based summary for the development of the NICE CFS/ME Guidelines, which were published in 2007.[1]. The review was undertaken in order to provide evidence in support of the NICE guidelines on CFS/ME. It has been criticised on several points.

Funding[edit | edit source]

Authors[edit | edit source]

Anne-Marie Bagnall, Susanne Hempel, Duncan Chambers, Vickie Orton, and Carol Forbes

Citation[edit | edit source]

Bagnall, Anne-Marie; Hempel, Susanne; Chambers, Duncan; Orton, Vickie; Forbes, Carol (2005). The diagnosis, treatment and management of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) / myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) in adults and children. Work to support the NICE Guidelines. Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York. (Full text)

Conclusions[edit | edit source]

Criticism[edit | edit source]

  • Hooper and Reid (2006) wrote a detailed critique of the report, and it was extensively criticized by ME charities.[2]
  • Although the review highlighted the potential use of immunoglobulin in CFS/ME, it was omitted from the summary.

Notable studies[edit | edit source]

  • 2003, THE MENTAL HEALTH MOVEMENT: PERSECUTION OF PATIENTS? A consideration of the role of Professor Simon Wessely and other members of the "Wessely School" in the perception of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) in the UK.Background Briefing for the House of Commons Select Health Committee.[3](Full text)
Includes extensive criticism of the earlier 2002 report from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination,
  • 2006, Inadequacy of the York (2005) Systematic Review of the CFS/ME Medical Evidence Base[2](Full text)

Learn more[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) - A fatigue-based illness. The term CFS was invented invented by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an replacement for myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). Some view CFS as a neurological disease, others use the term for any unexplained long-term fatigue. Sometimes used as a the term as a synonym of myalgic encephalomyelitis, despite the different diagnostic criteria.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

NICE guidelines - Clinical guidelines used in the UK.

myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) - A disease often marked by neurological symptoms, but fatigue is sometimes a symptom as well. Some diagnostic criteria distinguish it from chronic fatigue syndrome, while other diagnostic criteria consider it to be a synonym for chronic fatigue syndrome. A defining characteristic of ME is post-exertional malaise (PEM), or post-exertional neuroimmune exhaustion (PENE), which is a notable exacerbation of symptoms brought on by small exertions. PEM can last for days or weeks. Symptoms can include cognitive impairments, muscle pain (myalgia), trouble remaining upright (orthostatic intolerance), sleep abnormalities, and gastro-intestinal impairments, among others. An estimated 25% of those suffering from ME are housebound or bedbound. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies ME as a neurological disease.

The information provided at this site is not intended to diagnose or treat any illness.
From MEpedia, a crowd-sourced encyclopedia of ME and CFS science and history.